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provincial
used in
Middlemarch
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provincial
Used in
Middlemarch
Go to Book Vocabulary
  • "There are few things better worth the pains in a provincial town like this," said Lydgate.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • I have consulted eminent men in the metropolis, and I am painfully aware of the backwardness under which medical treatment labors in our provincial districts.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • The unreformed provincial mind distrusted London; and while true religion was everywhere saving, honest Mrs. Bulstrode was convinced that to be saved in the Church was more respectable.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • And surely among all men whose vocation requires them to exhibit their powers of speech, the happiest is a prosperous provincial auctioneer keenly alive to his own jokes and sensible of his encyclopedic knowledge.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • As manager of the household she felt bound to ask them in good provincial fashion to stay and eat; but she chose to consult Mrs. Vincy on the point of extra down-stairs consumption now that Mr. Featherstone was laid up.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • The two girls had not only known each other in childhood, but had been at the same provincial school together (Mary as an articled pupil), so that they had many memories in common, and liked very well to talk in private.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • As to any provincial history in which the agents are all of high moral rank, that must be of a date long posterior to the first Reform Bill, and Peter Featherstone, you perceive, was dead and buried some months before Lord Grey came into office.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • A learned provincial clergyman is accustomed to think of his acquaintances as of "lords, knyghtes, and other noble and worthi men, that conne Latyn but lytille."  (not reviewed by editor)

  • But that Herschel, for example, who "broke the barriers of the heavens"—did he not once play a provincial church-organ, and give music-lessons to stumbling pianists?  (not reviewed by editor)

  • There was nothing unendurable now: the debts were paid, Mr. Ladislaw was coming, and Lydgate would be persuaded to leave Middlemarch and settle in London, which was "so different from a provincial town."  (not reviewed by editor)

  • The doubt hinted by Mr. Vincy whether it were only the general election or the end of the world that was coming on, now that George the Fourth was dead, Parliament dissolved, Wellington and Peel generally depreciated and the new King apologetic, was a feeble type of the uncertainties in provincial opinion at that time.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Old provincial society had its share of this subtle movement: had not only its striking downfalls, its brilliant young professional dandies who ended by living up an entry with a drab and six children for their establishment, but also those less marked vicissitudes which are constantly shifting the boundaries of social intercourse, and begetting new consciousness of interdependence.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • A fine fever hospital in addition to the old infirmary might be the nucleus of a medical school here, when once we get our medical reforms; and what would do more for medical education than the spread of such schools over the country? A born provincial man who has a grain of public spirit as well as a few ideas, should do what he can to resist the rush of everything that is a little better than common towards London.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Her hand and wrist were so finely formed that she could wear sleeves not less bare of style than those in which the Blessed Virgin appeared to Italian painters; and her profile as well as her stature and bearing seemed to gain the more dignity from her plain garments, which by the side of provincial fashion gave her the impressiveness of a fine quotation from the Bible,—or from one of our elder poets,—in a paragraph of to-day's newspaper.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Opinions may be divided as to his wisdom in making this present: some may think that it was a graceful attention to be expected from a man like Lydgate, and that the fault of any troublesome consequences lay in the pinched narrowness of provincial life at that time, which offered no conveniences for professional people whose fortune was not proportioned to their tastes; also, in Lydgate's ridiculous fastidiousness about asking his friends for money.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Those were less expensive times than our own, and provincial life was comparatively modest; but the ease with which a medical man who had lately bought a practice, who thought that he was obliged to keep two horses, whose table was supplied without stint, and who paid an insurance on his life and a high rent for house and garden, might find his expenses doubling his receipts, can be conceived by any one who does not think these details beneath his consideration.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • He went to study in Paris with the determination that when he provincial home again he would settle in some provincial town as a general practitioner, and resist the irrational severance between medical and surgical knowledge in the interest of his own scientific pursuits, as well as of the general advance: he would keep away from the range of London intrigues, jealousies, and social truckling, and win celebrity, however slowly, as Jenner had done, by the independent value of his work.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • He went to study in Paris with the determination that when he provincial home again he would settle in some provincial town as a general practitioner, and resist the irrational severance between medical and surgical knowledge in the interest of his own scientific pursuits, as well as of the general advance: he would keep away from the range of London intrigues, jealousies, and social truckling, and win celebrity, however slowly, as Jenner had done, by the independent value of his work.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • She was regarded as an heiress; for not only had the sisters seven hundred a-year each from their parents, but if Dorothea married and had a son, that son would inherit Mr. Brooke's estate, presumably worth about three thousand a-year—a rental which seemed wealth to provincial families, still discussing Mr. Peel's late conduct on the Catholic question, innocent of future gold-fields, and of that gorgeous plutocracy which has so nobly exalted the necessities of genteel life.  (not reviewed by editor)

Samples from Other Sources
  • In that well-traveled company I felt uncomfortably provincial.

  • narrow provincial attitudes

  • Without consideration, he dismissed her ideas as provincial.

  • To the urbane, such a view sometimes sounds embarrassingly provincial.
    Nicholas Eberstadt  --  Starved for Ideas  --  http://www.aei.org/publications/pubID.7134/pub_detail.asp(retrieved 06/29/06)

  • In the years since, ... educational thinkers have unapologetically called for schooling to free students from the yoke of their family`s provincial understandings.
    Frederick M. Hess  --  What Is a "Public School"?  --  http://www.aei.org/publications/pubID.19900/pub_detail.asp(retrieved 06/29/06)

  • He was one of Herat`s best-connected men, friend of the mayor and the provincial governor.
    Khaled Hosseini  --  A Thousand Splendid Suns

  • ...to correct Henry`s provincial manners and speech and clothing.
    William Faulkner  --  Absalom, Absalom!

  • It was as if we were a provincial audience,
    Susanna Kaysen  --  Girl Interrupted
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