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notorious
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Middlemarch
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notorious
Used In
Middlemarch
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  • "And a devilish deal better than too much," said Mr. Hawley, whose bad language was notorious in that part of the county.
  • Exiles notoriously feed much on hopes, and are unlikely to stay in banishment unless they are obliged.
  • "I disapprove of Wakley," interposed Dr. Sprague, "no man more: he is an ill-intentioned fellow, who would sacrifice the respectability of the profession, which everybody knows depends on the London Colleges, for the sake of getting some notoriety for himself.

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  • He was a notorious drug dealer.
  • He is notorious for flagrant fouls and losing his temper.

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