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naive
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Middlemarch
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naive
Used In
Middlemarch
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  • Celia was not without a touch of naive malice.
  • He showed the white object under his arm, which was a tiny Maltese puppy, one of nature’s most naive toys.
  • Miss Brooke was certainly very naive with all her alleged cleverness.
  • "What can be their reasons?" said Dorothea, with naive surprise.
  • Rosamond was naively convinced of what an old gentleman ought to do to prevent her from suffering annoyance.
  • He was often invited to the Bulstrodes’; but the girls there were hardly out of the schoolroom; and Mrs. Bulstrode’s naive way of conciliating piety and worldliness, the nothingness of this life and the desirability of cut glass, the consciousness at once of filthy rags and the best damask, was not a sufficient relief from the weight of her husband’s invariable seriousness.
  • (A more naive girl would have said, "Oh, everything!"

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  • You—Aunty, do you know the stuff in that thing makes Dr. Goebbels look like a naive little country boy?
    Harper Lee  --  Go Set a Watchman
  • I realize that some naive sliver of me hoped that he was better than this.
    Sabaa Tahir  --  An Ember in the Ashes

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