To better see all uses of the word
metaphor
in
Middlemarch
please enable javascript.

metaphor
Used In
Middlemarch
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • In this way, metaphorically speaking, a strong lens applied to Mrs. Cadwallader’s match-making will show a play of minute causes producing what may be called thought and speech vortices to bring her the sort of food she needed.
  • It was this which made Dorothea so childlike, and, according to some judges, so stupid, with all her reputed cleverness; as, for example, in the present case of throwing herself, metaphorically speaking, at Mr. Casaubon’s feet, and kissing his unfashionable shoe-ties as if he were a Protestant Pope.
  • Poor Mr. Casaubon had imagined that his long studious bachelorhood had stored up for him a compound interest of enjoyment, and that large drafts on his affections would not fail to be honored; for we all of us, grave or light, get our thoughts entangled in metaphors, and act fatally on the strength of them.
  • But the fighting with Mr. Farebrother must be of a metaphorical kind, which was much more difficult to Fred than the muscular.
  • The broken metaphor and bad logic of motive which had stirred his hearer’s contempt were quite consistent with a mode of putting the facts which made it difficult for Lydgate to vent his own indignation and disappointment.
  • Metaphors and precedents were not wanting; peculiar spiritual experiences were not wanting which at last made the retention of his position seem a service demanded of him: the vista of a fortune had already opened itself, and Bulstrode’s shrinking remained private.
  • "You have at all events taken your share in using good practical precautions for the town, and that is the best mode of asking for protection," said Lydgate, with a strong distaste for the broken metaphor and bad logic of the banker’s religion, somewhat increased by the apparent deafness of his sympathy.

  • There are no more uses of "metaphor" in the book.


    Show samples from other sources
  • He was speaking metaphorically when he referred to being mugged by reality.
  • It was falling so hard that it looked like white sparks (and this is a simile, too, not a metaphor).
    Mark Haddon  --  The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading