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malicious
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Middlemarch
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malicious
Used In
Middlemarch
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  • Celia was not without a touch of naive malice.
  • Celia, who had been hanging a little in the rear, came up presently, when she saw that Mr. Casaubon was gone away, and said in her easy staccato, which always seemed to contradict the suspicion of any malicious intent— "Do you know, Dorothea, I saw some one quite young coming up one of the walks."
  • It is too bad to bear me malice.
  • I may trust then to your solemn assurance that you will not repeat either to man or woman what—even if it have any degree of truth in it—is yet a malicious representation?
  • Ay, said Mr. Malice, for I hate the very look of him.
  • I shall supply you with money now, and I will furnish you with a reasonable sum from time to time, on your application to me by letter; but if you choose to present yourself here again, if you return to Middlemarch, if you use your tongue in a manner injurious to me, you will have to live on such fruits as your malice can bring you, without help from me.
  • Then went the jury out whose names were Mr. Blindman, Mr. No-good, Mr. Malice, Mr. Love-lust, Mr. Live-loose, Mr. Heady, Mr. High-mind, Mr. Enmity, Mr. Liar, Mr. Cruelty, Mr. Hate-light, Mr. Implacable, who every one gave in his private verdict against him among themselves, and afterwards unanimously concluded to bring him in guilty before the judge.

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  • I am not interested in hearing malicious gossip.
  • Words can be like baseball bats when used maliciously.
    Sidney Madwed

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