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indignant
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Middlemarch
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indignant
Used In
Middlemarch
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  • However just her indignation might be, her ideal was not to claim justice, but to give tenderness.
  • He was not a man to feel any strong moral indignation even on account of trespasses against himself.
  • She was certainly treating him with more indifference than usual: she did not know how affectionately indignant he had felt on her behalf up-stairs.
  • "But look at Casaubon," said Sir James, indignantly.
  • "I think it was a very cheap wish of his," said Dorothea, indignantly.
  • "How dare you make any comparison between my father and you, Fred?" said Mary, in a deep tone of indignation.
  • Dorothea was indignant in her turn.
  • She was beginning to be shocked that she had got to such a point of supposition, and indignant with Will for having led her to it.
  • "How can you let Tantripp talk such gossip to you, Celia?" said Dorothea, indignantly, not the less angry because details asleep in her memory were now awakened to confirm the unwelcome revelation.
  • There was another attraction in his profession: it wanted reform, and gave a man an opportunity for some indignant resolve to reject its venal decorations and other humbug, and to be the possessor of genuine though undemanded qualifications.
  • No nature could be less suspicious than hers: when she was a child she believed in the gratitude of wasps and the honorable susceptibility of sparrows, and was proportionately indignant when their baseness was made manifest.
  • "How very petty!" exclaimed Dorothea, indignantly.
  • Mr. Vincy was the first to speak—after using his snuff-box energetically—and he spoke with loud indignation.
  • It was a question whether gratitude which refers to what is done for one’s self ought not to give way to indignation at what is done against another.
  • She rose and said with a touch of indignation as well as hauteur— "You are much the happier of us two, Mr. Ladislaw, to have nothing."
  • But Dorothea was strangely quiet—not immediately indignant, as she had been on a like occasion in Rome.
  • "There’s not a more paltry fellow in Middlemarch than Bowyer," said Ladislaw, indignantly, "but it seems as if the paltry fellows were always to turn the scale."
  • Mr. Casaubon had taken a cruelly effective means of hindering her: even with indignation against him in her heart, any act that seemed a triumphant eluding of his purpose revolted her.
  • "My dear sir," persisted Sir James, restraining his indignation within respectful forms, "it was you who brought him here, and you who keep him here—I mean by the occupation you give him."
  • The small bequests came first, and even the recollection that there was another will and that poor Peter might have thought better of it, could not quell the rising disgust and indignation.
  • The pity which had been the restraining compelling motive in her life with him still clung about his image, even while she remonstrated with him in indignant thought and told him that he was unjust.
  • In her indignation there was a sense of superiority, but it went out for the present in firmness of stroke, and did not compress itself into an inward articulate voice pronouncing the once "affable archangel" a poor creature.
  • This was a shuffling concession of Mr. Brooke’s to Sir James Chettam’s indignant remonstrance; and Will, awake to the slightest hint in this direction, concluded that he was to be kept away from the Grange on Dorothea’s account.
  • Mary exclaimed indignantly, blushing deeply, and surprised out of all her readiness in reply.
  • "Look you there now!" said Mrs. Dollop, indignantly.
  • He did not storm in indignation—he felt too sad a sinking of the heart.
  • Dorothea left Ladislaw’s two letters unread on her husband’s writing-table and went to her own place, the scorn and indignation within her rejecting the reading of these letters, just as we hurl away any trash towards which we seem to have been suspected of mean cupidity.
  • In her first outleap of jealous indignation and disgust, when quitting the hateful room, she had flung away all the mercy with which she had undertaken that visit.
  • "That is not so very easy for a man of any dignity—with any sense of right—when the affair happens to be in his own family," said Sir James, still in his white indignation.
  • She had never felt anything like this triumphant power of indignation in the struggle of her married life, in which there had always been a quickly subduing pang; and she took it as a sign of new strength.
  • The broken metaphor and bad logic of motive which had stirred his hearer’s contempt were quite consistent with a mode of putting the facts which made it difficult for Lydgate to vent his own indignation and disappointment.
  • It was Lydgate’s misfortune and Rosamond’s too, that his tenderness towards her, which was both an emotional prompting and a well-considered resolve, was inevitably interrupted by these outbursts of indignation either ironical or remonstrant.
  • Her whole heart was going out at this moment in sympathy with Will’s indignation: she only wanted to convince him that she had never done him injustice, and he seemed to have turned away from her as if she too had been part of the unfriendly world.
  • Any stranger peeping into the office at that moment might have wondered what was the drama between the indignant man of business, and the fine-looking young fellow whose blond complexion was getting rather patchy as he bit his lip with mortification.
  • He had never mentioned to Rosamond his brooding purpose of going to Quallingham: he did not want to admit what would appear to her a concession to her wishes after indignant refusal, until the last moment; but he was really expecting to set off soon.
  • And there, aloof, yet persistently with her, moving wherever she moved, was the Will Ladislaw’ who was a changed belief exhausted of hope, a detected illusion—no, a living man towards whom there could not yet struggle any wail of regretful pity, from the midst of scorn and indignation and jealous offended pride.
  • "Yes, young people are usually blind to everything but their own wishes, and seldom imagine how much those wishes cost others," said Mrs. Garth She did not mean to go beyond this salutary general doctrine, and threw her indignation into a needless unwinding of her worsted, knitting her brow at it with a grand air.
  • Lydgate pausing and looking at her began to feel that half-maddening sense of helplessness which comes over passionate people when their passion is met by an innocent-looking silence whose meek victimized air seems to put them in the wrong, and at last infects even the justest indignation with a doubt of its justice.
  • Caleb’s wrath was stirred, and he said, indignantly— "Why should I have said it if I didn’t mean it?
  • "You began by saying that one report was false, Mrs. Cadwallader, and I believe this is false too," said Dorothea, with indignant energy; "at least, I feel sure it is a misrepresentation.

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  • She was indignant, but agreed to be searched when they accused her of shoplifting.
  • "I am not a fool," she said indignantly.

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