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grave -- as in: Her manner was grave.
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  • "Fly, Fly, I am ashamed of you," Mary was saying in a grave contralto.
  • Mary in her turn was silent, wondering not at Mr. Farebrother’s manner but at his tone, which had a grave restrained emotion in it.
  • "Because this is one of a dozen, and without it there would only be eleven," said Mary, with a grave air of explanation, so that Letty sank back with a sense of knowledge.
  • Her face being, from her entrance, towards the chancel, even her shortsighted eyes soon discerned Will, but there was no outward show of her feeling except a slight paleness and a grave bow as she passed him.
  • "Very well, Doctor Grave-face," said Rosy, dimpling, "I will declare in future that I dote on skeletons, and body-snatchers, and bits of things in phials, and quarrels with everybody, that end in your dying miserably."
  • No, no, I am a grave old parson.
  • The soul of man," said Caleb, with the deep tone and grave shake of the head which always came when he used this phrase—"The soul of man, when it gets fairly rotten, will bear you all sorts of poisonous toad-stools, and no eye can see whence came the seed thereof."
  • "Can you not see, Rosamond," he began again, trying to be simply grave and not bitter, "that nothing can be so fatal as a want of openness and confidence between us?
  • For should not grave and learn’d Experience That looks with the eyes of all the world beside, And with all ages holds intelligence, Go safer than Deceit without a guide!
  • "I did not believe that you would let any circumstance of my birth create a prejudice in you against me, though it was sure to do so in others," said Will, shaking his head backward in his old way, and looking with a grave appeal into her eyes.
  • His face had an expression of grave surprise, which alarmed her a little, but he did not like to be questioned while he was reading, and she remained anxiously watching till she saw him suddenly shaken by a little joyous laugh as he turned back to the beginning of the letter, and looking at her above his spectacles, said, in a low tone, "What do you think, Susan?"
  • With Rosamond, on the other hand, he pouted and was wayward—nay, often uncomplimentary, much to her inward surprise; nevertheless he was gradually becoming necessary to her entertainment by his companionship in her music, his varied talk, and his freedom from the grave preoccupation which, with all her husband’s tenderness and indulgence, often made his manners unsatisfactory to her, and confirmed her dislike of the medical profession.
  • It was a strange reversal of attitudes: Fred’s blond face and blue eyes, usually bright and careless, ready to give attention to anything that held out a promise of amusement, looking involuntarily grave and almost embarrassed as if by the sight of something unfitting; while Lydgate, who had habitually an air of self-possessed strength, and a certain meditativeness that seemed to lie behind his most observant attention, was acting, watching, speaking with that excited narrow…
  • Mr. Casaubon gravely smiled approval, and said to Mr. Brooke, "You have an excellent secretary at hand, you perceive."
  • "You make me feel very uncomfortable, Mary," said Rosamond, with her gravest mildness; "I would not tell mamma for the world."
  • She had returned from her brief pacing and stood opposite Will, looking gravely at him.
  • Celia knelt down to get the right level and gave her little butterfly kiss, while Dorothea encircled her with gentle arms and pressed her lips gravely on each cheek in turn.
  • "I must give you the ninety-two pounds that I have put by for Alfred’s premium," said Mrs. Garth, gravely and decisively, though a nice ear might have discerned a slight tremor in some of the words.
  • Mr. Casaubon gravely hoped that Will was passing his time profitably as well as pleasantly in Rome—had thought his intention was to remain in South Germany—but begged him to come and dine to-morrow, when he could converse more at large: at present he was somewhat weary.
  • "You are alone, I see, my dear," she said, as they entered the drawing-room together, looking round gravely.
  • "It is the grandest profession in the world, Rosamond," said Lydgate, gravely.
  • But there were various subjects that Dorothea was trying to get clear upon, and she resolved to throw herself energetically into the gravest of all.
  • The most innocent echo has an impish mockery in it when it follows a gravely persistent speaker, and this echo was not at all innocent; if it did not follow with the precision of a natural echo, it had a wicked choice of the words it overtook.
  • Farebrother has always been such a friend of ours; and Mary, I knew, would listen to him gravely; and he took it on himself quite readily.
  • "Oh," said Caleb, bowing his head and waving his hand gravely.
  • Then, after a little pause, she said, more gravely, bending her face before her father’s, "If you are contented with Fred?"
  • Moreover, the decision would be more certainly understood to be final, if the interview took place in his father’s gravest hours, which were always those spent in his private room at the warehouse.
  • Lydgate at last seated himself, not in his usual chair, but in one nearer to Rosamond, leaning aside in it towards her, and looking at her gravely before he reopened the sad subject.
  • When the invitations had been accepted, she would tell Lydgate, and give him a wise admonition as to how a medical man should behave to his neighbors; for Rosamond had the gravest little airs possible about other people’s duties.
  • He went straight from Mr. Garth’s office to the warehouse, rightly feeling that the most respectful way in which he could behave to his father was to make the painful communication as gravely and formally as possible.
  • "Don’t fear for me, father," said Mary, gravely meeting her father’s eyes; "Fred has always been very good to me; he is kind-hearted and affectionate, and not false, I think, with all his self-indulgence.
  • "No," said Caleb, gravely; "I am thinking that I could do a great turn for Fred Vincy.
  • "Brother Peter," he said, in a wheedling yet gravely official tone, "It’s nothing but right I should speak to you about the Three Crofts and the Manganese.
  • "It wouldn’t make me happy to do such a nasty duty as that," said Alfred—at which Mary and her father laughed silently, but Mrs. Garth said, gravely— "Do find a fitter word than nasty, my dear Alfred, for everything that you think disagreeable.
  • "Why, yes," said Caleb, looking up gravely, "there is something wrong—a stranger, who is very ill, I think.

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  • Her smile disappeared as she suddenly realized the gravity of her situation.
  • It was the day of the funeral and she was in a grave mood.

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