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cordial
in
Middlemarch
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cordial -- as in: a cordial reception
Used In
Middlemarch
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  • "Bless you both, my dears, and don’t quarrel," said Mrs. Vincy, with motherly cordiality.
  • "That I can understand," said Dorothea, cordially.
  • Dorothea spoke in a full cordial tone, half caressing, half explanatory.
  • "Oh yes," said Dorothea, cordially.
  • He said "I think so" with an air of so much deference accompanying the insight of agreement, that she formed the most cordial opinion of his talents.
  • But any answer was dispensed with by the entrance of three gentlemen, with whom there were greetings more or less cordial.
  • "Ah, to be sure," said Raffles, with a mocking cordiality.
  • "I am glad you have told me this, Mr. Lydgate," said Dorothea, cordially.
  • Lydgate took Mr. Farebrother’s hints very cordially, though he would hardly have borne them from another man.
  • Dorothea put out her hand and said her good-by cordially.
  • Here he turned his head towards Mrs. Vincy, and swallowed some more of his cordial.
  • By-and-by she would go to him with the cordial.
  • Old Featherstone no sooner caught sight of these funereal figures appearing in spite of his orders than rage came to strengthen him more successfully than the cordial.
  • And Mr. Casaubon shrank nervously from communicating on the subject with Sir James Chettam, between whom and himself there had never been any cordiality, and who would immediately think of Dorothea without any mention of her.
  • "Thank you for coming," said Lydgate, cordially.
  • Her cordial look, when she put out her hand to him, softened his expression, but only with melancholy.
  • The cordial, pleading tones which seemed to flow with generous heedlessness above all the facts which had filled Rosamond’s mind as grounds of obstruction and hatred between her and this woman, came as soothingly as a warm stream over her shrinking fears.
  • He stood in a conspicuous place not far from the auctioneer, with a fore-finger in each side-pocket and his head thrown backward, not caring to speak to anybody, though he had been cordially welcomed as a connoiss_ure_ by Mr. Trumbull, who was enjoying the utmost activity of his great faculties.
  • He had not been accustomed to very cordial relations with his neighbors, and hence he could not miss the signs of cordiality; moreover, he had been taking journeys on business of various kinds, having now made up his mind that he need not quit Middlemarch, and feeling able consequently to determine on matters which he had before left in suspense.
  • He had not been accustomed to very cordial relations with his neighbors, and hence he could not miss the signs of cordiality; moreover, he had been taking journeys on business of various kinds, having now made up his mind that he need not quit Middlemarch, and feeling able consequently to determine on matters which he had before left in suspense.
  • …sent through Mary Garth, they had presented themselves together within the door of the bedroom, both in black—Mrs. Waule having a white handkerchief partially unfolded in her hand—and both with faces in a sort of half-mourning purple; while Mrs. Vincy with her pink cheeks and pink ribbons flying was actually administering a cordial to their own brother, and the light-complexioned Fred, his short hair curling as might be expected in a gambler’s, was lolling at his ease in a large chair.
  • …overseer (it was about a question of outdoor pay that he was having an interview with Lydgate), he was also asthmatic and had an increasing family: thus, from a medical point of view, as well as from his own, he was an important man; indeed, an exceptional grocer, whose hair was arranged in a flame-like pyramid, and whose retail deference was of the cordial, encouraging kind—jocosely complimentary, and with a certain considerate abstinence from letting out the full force of his mind.
  • The current carried even Mr. Horrock with it, but this committal of himself to an opinion fell from him with so little sacrifice of his neutral expression, that the bid might not have been detected as his but for the friendly oaths of Mr. Bambridge, who wanted to know what Horrock would do with blasted stuff only fit for haberdashers given over to that state of perdition which the horse-dealer so cordially recognized in the majority of earthly existences.
  • "Let me give you some cordial," she said, quietly, "and try to compose yourself.

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  • The countries share a long border and have cordial relations.
  • We had a cordial exchange of ideas.

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