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complacent
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Middlemarch
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complacent
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Middlemarch
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  • He also took away a complacent sense that he was making great progress in Miss Brooke’s good opinion.
  • It’s rather a strong check to one’s self-complacency to find how much of one’s right doing depends on not being in want of money.
  • Mrs. Vincy, in her fullest matronly bloom, looked at Mary’s little figure, rough wavy hair, and visage quite without lilies and roses, and wondered; trying unsuccessfully to fancy herself caring about Mary’s appearance in wedding clothes, or feeling complacency in grandchildren who would "feature" the Garths.
  • Upright Sir James Chettam was convinced that his own satisfaction was righteous when he thought with some complacency that here was an added league to that mountainous distance between Ladislaw and Dorothea, which enabled him to dismiss any anxiety in that direction as too absurd.
  • Then, again, there was the love of truth—a wide phrase, but meaning in this relation, a lively objection to seeing a wife look happier than her husband’s character warranted, or manifest too much satisfaction in her lot—the poor thing should have some hint given her that if she knew the truth she would have less complacency in her bonnet, and in light dishes for a supper-party.

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  • He had become complacent after years of success.
  • This team could win State if they stay hungry instead of getting too complacent.

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