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minuteness
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The Idiot
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minuteness
Used In
The Idiot
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unspecified meaning
  • I’ll tell him at once—he will be free in a minute; but you—you had better wait in the ante-chamber,—hadn’t you?
  • A couple of minutes later the door opened again and the affable voice of Gania cried: "Come in please, prince!"

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  • Stop a minute; where are you off to?
  • "Oh, I’ll write you a new one in half a minute," said the prince, "if you like!"
  • How I should grudge and count up every minute of it, so as to waste not a single instant!’
  • He said that he had not lived a bit as he had intended, and had wasted many, and many a minute.
  • The prince gazed at it for a minute or two, then glanced around him, and hurriedly raised the portrait to his lips.
  • When, a minute after, he reached the drawing-room door, his face was quite composed.
  • Wait a minute,"; she added, "I want to give you something for a keepsake.
  • Gania was silent for a minute or two, as though thinking out some problem.

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  • She was hysterical, and laughed aloud every other minute with no apparent reason—the next moment relapsing into gloom and thoughtfulness.
  • "Hey! look at it, it’ll burn in another minute or two!" cried Nastasia Philipovna.
  • "Oh, what a queen she is!" he ejaculated, every other minute, throwing out the remark for anyone who liked to catch it.
  • A priest went about among them with a cross: and there was about five minutes of time left for him to live.
  • He thought he would decide this question once for all in these last three minutes.
  • Did he keep careful account of his minutes?
  • "You are laughing, and I—that man’s tale impressed me so much, that I dreamt of it afterwards; yes, I dreamt of those five minutes."
  • Why invite witnesses when both of us would be walking in eternity in a couple of minutes?
  • The prince stayed behind, and meditated alone for a few minutes.
  • A visit to her is merely an affair of a few minutes; I am quite at home in her house.
  • In a few minutes the coffee appeared, and the prince did not refuse it.
  • They waited a few minutes in silence, while Lebedeff sat with his eyes fixed mournfully on the young man’s face.
  • It was a question of minutes when she slipped off to Petersburg.
  • Now this was precisely what Lebedeff had made up his mind to do in the last three minutes.
  • Sit down a minute.
  • A few minutes later he was aware from the noisy voices in the drawing room, that the conversation had become more quarrelsome than ever after his departure.
  • Then having bade farewell, he embarked upon those two minutes which he had allotted to looking into himself; he knew beforehand what he was going to think about.
  • He could not tear his eyes from these rays of light; he got the idea that these rays were his new nature, and that in three minutes he would become one of them, amalgamated somehow with them.
  • He wished to put it to himself as quickly and clearly as possible, that here was he, a living, thinking man, and that in three minutes he would be nobody; or if somebody or something, then what and where?
  • I thought of asking you to draw the face of a criminal, one minute before the fall of the guillotine, while the wretched man is still standing on the scaffold, preparatory to placing his neck on the block.
  • She immediately overwhelmed the general once more with questions, and within five minutes that gentleman was as happy as a king, and holding forth at the top of his voice, amid the laughter of almost all who heard him.
  • Twenty minutes later he had been reprieved and some other punishment substituted; but the interval between the two sentences, twenty minutes, or at least a quarter of an hour, had been passed in the certainty that within a few minutes he must die.
  • Twenty minutes later he had been reprieved and some other punishment substituted; but the interval between the two sentences, twenty minutes, or at least a quarter of an hour, had been passed in the certainty that within a few minutes he must die.
  • Twenty minutes later he had been reprieved and some other punishment substituted; but the interval between the two sentences, twenty minutes, or at least a quarter of an hour, had been passed in the certainty that within a few minutes he must die.
  • "In a minute or two I shall know all," he thought.
  • A violent fit of coughing, which lasted a full minute, prevented him from finishing his sentence.
  • A minute afterwards, Evgenie Pavlovitch reappeared on the terrace, in great agitation.
  • The next minute she flew at the prince, seized his hand, and dragged him after her to the door.
  • "I have a couple of words to say to you," he began, "and those on a very important matter; let’s go aside for a minute or two."
  • For a minute or two he could not speak at all, but panted and stared at Rogojin.
  • I thought of having an explanation with him, but I knew that if I did, he would begin to apologize in a minute or two, so I decided to let him alone.
  • Very soon, in five minutes or so, he was discovered, and a crowd collected around him.
  • During the last ten or twenty minutes, exasperated by continual interruptions, he had raised his voice, and spoken with great vehemence.
  • "Wait five minutes more, Mr. Burdovsky," said Gavrila Ardalionovitch pleasantly.
  • He burst out laughing, and was seized with a fit of coughing which lasted for two minutes and prevented him from speaking.
  • At last Varvara Ardalionovna came in search of her brother, and remained for a few minutes.
  • "Why, Keller said the same thing to me nearly word for word a few minutes ago!" cried Muishkin.
  • The whole episode had not lasted more than a couple of minutes.
  • "You have slept seven or perhaps eight minutes," said Evgenie Pavlovitch.
  • "So you counted the minutes while I slept, did you, Evgenie Pavlovitch?" he said, ironically.
  • For the first five minutes the reader’s voice continued to tremble, and he read disconnectedly and unevenly; but gradually his voice strengthened.
  • He had pointed it out to me himself as we walked past it, and I believe I must have stood a good five minutes in front of it.
  • So passed two or three minutes, and I recollect that his silence hurt and offended me very much.
  • Probably twenty minutes or so passed in this way.
  • If I had not formed a final resolve, but had decided to wait until the last minute, I should not leave my room, or accept his invitation to come and die at Pavlofsk.
  • After a minute or two he got up and came back to the table to listen to Lebedeff’s outpourings, as the latter passionately commentated on Evgenie Pavlovitch’s paradox.
  • But only a couple of minutes later, when they had reached the park, Aglaya suddenly remarked, in her usual calm, indifferent voice: "I wanted to see how the farce would end."
  • But _here_ I should imagine the most terrible part of the whole punishment is, not the bodily pain at all—but the certain knowledge that in an hour,—then in ten minutes, then in half a minute, then now—this very _instant_—your soul must quit your body and that you will no longer be a man—and that this is certain, _certain_!
  • But _here_ I should imagine the most terrible part of the whole punishment is, not the bodily pain at all—but the certain knowledge that in an hour,—then in ten minutes, then in half a minute, then now—this very _instant_—your soul must quit your body and that you will no longer be a man—and that this is certain, _certain_!
  • She merely looked closely at Evgenie for a minute, curious perhaps as to whether civil or military clothes became him best, then turned away and paid no more attention to him or his costume.
  • It was quite dark now, and Muishkin could not see her face clearly, but a minute or two later, when he and the general had left the villa, he suddenly flushed up, and squeezed his right hand tightly.
  • I saw how the man dashed about the room to find me an empty chair, how he kicked the rags off a chair which was covered up by them, brought it to me, and helped me to sit down; but my cough went on for another three minutes or so.
  • She tried to persuade me not to come, but I couldn’t help myself, just for one minute.
  • "Wait a minute, prince," shouted the latter, as he went.
  • Excuse me—wait a minute—he says that the leg we see is a wooden one, made by Tchernosvitoff.
  • Another minute and the laughter grew louder—they were laughing at him, at his dumb stupor—laughing kindly and merrily.
  • His face lighted up with joy when, at about two o’clock, he espied the Epanchins coming along to pay him a short visit, "just for a minute."
  • They really had only come for a minute.
  • The prince started and looked at her in perplexity; he seemed to be collecting his senses for a minute or so, before he could remember where he was.
  • He waited another minute, and decided to go and ring the bell once more; however, he thought better of it again and put it off for an hour.
  • He stood and stared for a minute or two.
  • Here he sat down and covered his face with his hands, and so remained for ten minutes.
  • But a man who knows for certain that he has but ten minutes to live and can talk like that—why—it’s—it’s PRIDE, that is!
  • I shall be back in five minutes.
  • He reappeared in five minutes as he had said.
  • The general spoke hotly and quickly for ten minutes; he spoke as though his words could not keep pace with his crowding thoughts.
  • But his answer was a fit of violent laughter which lasted ten whole minutes.
  • But, alas! peace did not reign for more than ten minutes.
  • In point of fact it is quite possible that the matter would have ended in a very commonplace and natural way in a few minutes.
  • Vera came in three minutes after the Epanchins had left.
  • The prince was surprised at this answer; but his astonishment increased a couple of minutes afterwards, when he began to consider it.
  • Neither spoke for five minutes.
  • I told them that she had called in for ten minutes, and then gone straight back to Pavlofsk.
  • By the ladies the prince was regarded as little better than a lunatic, and Princess Bielokonski admitted afterwards that "in another minute she would have bolted."
  • However, in a very few minutes he decided that to run away was impossible; that it would be cowardly; that great problems lay before him, and that he had no right to leave them unsolved, or at least to refuse to give all his energy and strength to the attempt to solve them.
  • Wait a minute, I want to ask you something else, Parfen; all sorts of things; but tell me first, did you intend to kill her before my wedding, at the church door, with your knife?
  • After each visit to Schneider’s establishment, Evgenie Pavlovitch writes another letter, besides that to Colia, giving the most minute particulars concerning the invalid’s condition.
  • Stop a minute!
  • Now and then he looked at Aglaya for five minutes at a time, without taking his eyes off her face; but his expression was very strange; he would gaze at her as though she were an object a couple of miles distant, or as though he were looking at her portrait and not at herself at all.
  • Aglaya looked menacingly at her laughing sisters, but could not contain herself any longer, and the next minute she too had burst into an irrepressible, and almost hysterical, fit of mirth.
  • Napoleon was struck; he thought a minute and then said to his suite: ’I like that boy’s pride; if all Russians think like this child’, then he didn’t finish, but went on and entered the palace.
  • He stood there for a minute and then, suddenly and strangely enough, it seemed to him that a little corner of one of the blinds was lifted, and Rogojin’s face appeared for an instant and then vanished.
  • He said that those five minutes seemed to him to be a most interminable period, an enormous wealth of time; he seemed to be living, in these minutes, so many lives that there was no need as yet to think of that last moment, so that he made several arrangements, dividing up the time into portions—one for saying farewell to his companions, two minutes for that; then a couple more for thinking over his own life and career and all about himself; and another minute for a last look around.
  • He said that those five minutes seemed to him to be a most interminable period, an enormous wealth of time; he seemed to be living, in these minutes, so many lives that there was no need as yet to think of that last moment, so that he made several arrangements, dividing up the time into portions—one for saying farewell to his companions, two minutes for that; then a couple more for thinking over his own life and career and all about himself; and another minute for a last look around.
  • He said that those five minutes seemed to him to be a most interminable period, an enormous wealth of time; he seemed to be living, in these minutes, so many lives that there was no need as yet to think of that last moment, so that he made several arrangements, dividing up the time into portions—one for saying farewell to his companions, two minutes for that; then a couple more for thinking over his own life and career and all about himself; and another minute for a last look around.
  • He said that those five minutes seemed to him to be a most interminable period, an enormous wealth of time; he seemed to be living, in these minutes, so many lives that there was no need as yet to think of that last moment, so that he made several arrangements, dividing up the time into portions—one for saying farewell to his companions, two minutes for that; then a couple more for thinking over his own life and career and all about himself; and another minute for a last look around.
  • For some minutes he did not seem to comprehend the excitement around him; that is, he comprehended it and saw everything, but he stood aside, as it were, like someone invisible in a fairy tale, as though he had nothing to do with what was going on, though it pleased him to take an interest in it.
  • He always asked if the patient wanted anything, and when the latter replied that he only wanted to be left in peace, he would turn away obediently and make for the door on tip-toe, with deprecatory gestures to imply that he had only just looked in, that he would not speak a word, and would go away and not intrude again; which did not prevent him from reappearing in ten minutes or a quarter of an hour.
  • In another minute or two he would probably have made up his mind to lead the prince quietly out of the room, on the plea of his being ill (and it was more than likely that the general was right in his belief that the prince WAS actually ill), but it so happened that destiny had something different in store.
  • It was said that Gania managed to make a fool of himself even on this occasion; for, finding himself alone with Aglaya for a minute or two when Varia had gone to the Epanchins’, he had thought it a fitting opportunity to make a declaration of his love, and on hearing this Aglaya, in spite of her state of mind at the time, had suddenly burst out laughing, and had put a strange question to him.
  • "Wait a minute, prince," said Aglaya, suddenly rising from her seat, "do write something in my album first, will you?
  • Devil take the thing!" he added, in a tempest of despair, "it will all be burnt up in a minute—It’s burning, it’s burning!"
  • "You probably wish to deduce, prince," said Alexandra, "that moments of time cannot be reckoned by money value, and that sometimes five minutes are worth priceless treasures.
  • "It was just a minute before the execution," began the prince, readily, carried away by the recollection and evidently forgetting everything else in a moment; "just at the instant when he stepped off the ladder on to the scaffold.
  • I’ll order some," she said, after a minute or two of silence.
  • They’ll all go in a couple of hours, and then I’ll ask you to give me twenty minutes-half an hour at most."
  • "You needn’t be afraid; I shall get through the whole thing in forty minutes, at most an hour!
  • I will open all the doors; I will call all my daughters, all of them, this very minute," said Lebedeff in a low voice, thoroughly frightened, and waving his hands as he ran from door to door.
  • Don’t go, he’ll blow his brains out in a minute!" cried Vera Lebedeff, rushing up to Hippolyte and catching hold of his hands in a torment of alarm.
  • "I won’t, I won’t be made to blush every minute by them all!
  • "Two minutes more, if you please, dear Ivan Fedorovitch," said Lizabetha Prokofievna to her husband; "it seems to me that he is in a fever and delirious; you can see by his eyes what a state he is in; it is impossible to let him go back to Petersburg tonight.

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To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: a minute amount Define
very, very small
as in: keep the minutes Define
a written record of what happened at a meeting
Show Multiple Meanings (More common than this sense)
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