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delirium
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Crime and Punishment
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delirium
Used In
Crime and Punishment
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as in: fever induced delirium Define
a usually brief state of mental confusion often accompanied by hallucinations
  • it’s simply the weakness of fever, a moment’s delirium,

  • There are no more uses of "delirium" identified with this meaning, but check unspecified meaning below.

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  • She should not be left alone in case the fever returns and makes her delirious.
  • What all did I say while I was delirious?
    S.E. Hinton  --  The Outsiders

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unspecified meaning
  • You are delirious, you know!
  • He was in a sort of delirium.

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  • CHAPTER III He was not completely unconscious, however, all the time he was ill; he was in a feverish state, sometimes delirious, sometimes half conscious.
  • Was it you I did not recognise when I was delirious?
  • Rodya has been ill for the last five days and delirious for three, but now he is recovering and has got an appetite.
  • So he had decided in the night of his delirium when several times he had had the impulse to get up and go away, to make haste, and get rid of it all.
  • "I can’t help thinking you are still delirious."
  • And that half-hour he had lost over an irrational plan, simply because he had thought of it in delirium!
  • Did I say anything in delirium?
  • Am I still in delirium, or is it real?

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  • Strange to say, he seemed immediately to have become perfectly calm; not a trace of his recent delirium nor of the panic fear that had haunted him of late.
  • Mechanically he drew from a chair beside him his old student’s winter coat, which was still warm though almost in rags, covered himself up with it and once more sank into drowsiness and delirium.
  • I am delirious?
  • They were beside themselves with alarm when they heard of his "running away" to-day, ill and, as they understood from her story, delirious!
  • You think I am delirious?
  • It was when I was wandering about yesterday, rather delirious, I chanced upon a man who had been run over…. a clerk….
  • He was unconscious and delirious all yesterday.
  • "But how could you have gone out if you hadn’t been delirious?"
  • I say, Mr. Zametov, was I sensible or delirious yesterday; settle our dispute.
  • Delirious, indeed…. ha-ha-ha!
  • Sonia spent the whole night feverish and delirious.
  • You were delirious when you did all this!
  • You said yesterday you were not delirious, you were particularly emphatic about it!
  • If you had anything on your conscience, you certainly ought to insist that you were delirious.
  • But if you notice anything—delirium or fever—wake me at once.
  • Yes, it was a sort of spring delirium.
  • "No, it was not only spring delirium," said Dounia, with warm feeling.
  • "I’ve not more than a silver rouble left…. after last night’s accursed delirium!"
  • He laid special emphasis on the delirium.
  • Here this man will go to the stake for me, and I find him delighted at having it cleared up why I spoke of rings in my delirium!
  • The flat even isn’t a fact but delirium.
  • So Porfiry, too, had nothing but that delirium, no facts but this psychology which cuts both ways, nothing positive.
  • Prompting you and giving you every means for your defence; illness, I said, delirium, injury, melancholy and the police officers and all the rest of it?
  • … She told us at once that you were lying in a high fever and had just run away from the doctor in delirium, and they were looking for you in the streets.
  • Why, my dear fellow, you may drive yourself into delirium if you have the impulse to work upon your nerves, to go ringing bells at night and asking about blood!
  • I was not delirious.
  • If you were actually a criminal, or were somehow mixed up in this damnable business, would you insist that you were not delirious but in full possession of your faculties?
  • Really delirious?
  • Delirious?
  • Would you believe, Porfiry, as soon as our backs were turned, he dressed, though he could hardly stand, and gave us the slip and went off on a spree somewhere till midnight, delirious all the time!
  • He was almost delirious; an uneasy smile strayed on his lips.
  • She would sometimes begin to cry suddenly and was often ill and feverishly delirious.
  • She sank more and more into uneasy delirium.
  • At times she shuddered, turned her eyes from side to side, recognised everyone for a minute, but at once sank into delirium again.
  • And then what about your trembling, what about your bell-ringing in your illness, in semi-delirium?
  • When Dounia returned from her last interview with her brother, she had found her mother already ill, in feverish delirium.
  • In her delirium she dropped words which showed that she knew a great deal more about her son’s terrible fate than they had supposed.
  • Though, indeed, all those psychological means of defence are not very reliable and cut both ways: illness, delirium, I don’t remember—that’s all right, but why, my good sir, in your illness and in your delirium were you haunted by just those delusions and not by any others?
  • Though, indeed, all those psychological means of defence are not very reliable and cut both ways: illness, delirium, I don’t remember—that’s all right, but why, my good sir, in your illness and in your delirium were you haunted by just those delusions and not by any others?
  • After a fatiguing day spent in continual fancies, in joyful day-dreams and tears, Pulcheria Alexandrovna was taken ill in the night and by morning she was feverish and delirious.
  • It wasn’t enough for him to suffer agony behind the door while they battered at the door and rung the bell, no, he had to go to the empty lodging, half delirious, to recall the bell-ringing, he wanted to feel the cold shiver over again….
  • …and candid smile that his words had been exaggerated; that certainly the patient had some fixed idea, something approaching a monomania—he, Zossimov, was now particularly studying this interesting branch of medicine—but that it must be recollected that until to-day the patient had been in delirium and…. and that no doubt the presence of his family would have a favourable effect on his recovery and distract his mind, "if only all fresh shocks can be avoided," he added significantly.
  • Simply because a poor student, unhinged by poverty and hypochondria, on the eve of a severe delirious illness (note that), suspicious, vain, proud, who has not seen a soul to speak to for six months, in rags and in boots without soles, has to face some wretched policemen and put up with their insolence; and the unexpected debt thrust under his nose, the I.O.U. presented by Tchebarov, the new paint, thirty degrees Reaumur and a stifling atmosphere, a crowd of people, the talk about the…
  • "Do you hear, sister," he repeated after them, making a last effort, "I am not delirious; this marriage is—an infamy.
  • "Then that’s why you…. were stuck…. partly…. you know in your delirium you were continually mentioning some rings or chains!
  • She must be the same as I am," he added, straining himself to think, as it were struggling with delirium.
  • It really is nonsense, if you think of it," he muttered, like a man in delirium.

  • There are no more uses of "delirium" in the book.


To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: fever induced delirium Define
a usually brief state of mental confusion often accompanied by hallucinations
as in: delirious with joy Define
a state of having been taken over by excitement or emotion
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