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The Idiot
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The Idiot
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  • I felt how lovely it was, but the loveliness weighed upon me somehow or other, and made me feel melancholy.
  • He was one of the persons under treatment with my professor; he had fits, and attacks of melancholy, then he would weep, and once he tried to commit suicide.
  • How melancholy they had been when they saw me off!
  • "General, they say you require rest," said Nastasia Philipovna, with the melancholy face of a child whose toy is taken away.
  • Crowds of melancholy people plodded wearily along the footpaths, with here and there a drunken man among them.
  • An hour later, she came to me again, looking melancholy.
  • The melancholy appearance of some of her guests seemed to add to her sarcastic humour, and perhaps the very cynicism and cruelty of the game proposed by Ferdishenko pleased her.
  • I remember my melancholy was intolerable; I felt inclined to cry; I sat and wondered and wondered uncomfortably; the consciousness that everything was strange weighed terribly upon me; I could understand that it was all foreign and strange.
  • "How strange it all is! how strange!" he muttered, melancholy enough now.
  • In moments of great joy, he invariably felt a sensation of melancholy come over him—he could not tell why.
  • All the time he was trying to forget some thing, to escape from some idea that haunted him; but melancholy thoughts came back, though he would so willingly have escaped from them.
  • I began to ask questions about them, for I had never seen one before; and I at once came to the conclusion that this must be one of the most useful of animals—strong, willing, patient, cheap; and, thanks to this donkey, I began to like the whole country I was travelling through; and my melancholy passed away.
  • But look here, Colia, I’m tired; besides, the subject is too melancholy to begin upon again.
  • Colia, too, in spite of his melancholy, had once or twice begun sentences in much the same strain of suggestion or insinuation.
  • Oh, I am sad, I am melancholy!
  • You are being undermined, pitilessly undermined, and—and it is really melancholy to see you so calm about it.
  • My word! what a thing to be melancholy about!
  • But this evening her melancholy and thoughtfulness grew with every hour.
  • She always ended by getting the better of her melancholy, and becoming merry and cheerful again, but not quite so unaffectedly happy as she had been some days earlier.
  • Up to this time she had invariably done her best to cheer him—she was afraid of his looking melancholy; she would try singing to him, and telling him every sort of funny story or reminiscence that she could recall.
  • THIS same morning dawned for the prince pregnant with no less painful presentiments,—which fact his physical state was, of course, quite enough to account for; but he was so indefinably melancholy,—his sadness could not attach itself to anything in particular, and this tormented him more than anything else.
  • What a fool I was to listen to you!" he added, with profound melancholy.
  • The general liked serious subjects of conversation; but both he and Lizabetha Prokofievna felt that they were having a little too much of a good thing tonight, and as the evening advanced, they both grew more or less melancholy; but towards night, the prince fell to telling funny stories, and was always the first to burst out laughing himself, which he invariably did so joyously and simply that the rest laughed just as much at him as at his stories.

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  • Since her dog died she’s been in a melancholy mood.
  • This weather makes me melancholy. I can’t wait for spring,

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