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malicious
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The Idiot
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malicious
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The Idiot
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  • And Rogojin burst out laughing, this time with unconcealed malice, as though he were glad that he had been able to find an opportunity for giving vent to it.
  • How maliciously Nastasia laughed at the idea of such a thing, now!
  • Now, you have been with me but a quarter of an hour, and all my malice seems to have melted away, and you are as dear to me as ever.
  • This is an excess of ingenuousness or of malice—you ought to know better than anyone which word best fits the case.
  • His nose was broad and flat, and he had high cheek bones; his thin lips were constantly compressed into an impudent, ironical—it might almost be called a malicious—smile; but his forehead was high and well formed, and atoned for a good deal of the ugliness of the lower part of his face.
  • It is their wickedness, their perpetual detestable malice—that’s what it is—they are all full of malice, malice!
  • It is their wickedness, their perpetual detestable malice—that’s what it is—they are all full of malice, malice!
  • It is their wickedness, their perpetual detestable malice—that’s what it is—they are all full of malice, malice!
  • "Kapiton didn’t exist either!" persisted Gania, maliciously.
  • The first sensation of alarm soon gave place to amusement; some burst out laughing loud and heartily, and seemed to find a malicious satisfaction in the joke.
  • He was tearful at first, but grew more and more sarcastic and malicious as the interview proceeded.
  • He looked at Gania with an expression of malice.
  • They looked at one another with undisguised malice.
  • Know, you young greenhorn, that I was covered with honours before ever you were born; and you are nothing better than a wretched little worm, torn in two with coughing, and dying slowly of your own malice and unbelief.
  • If Hippolyte and Nina Alexandrovna had, as Gania suspected, had some special conversation about the general’s actions, it was strange that the malicious youth, whom Gania had called a scandal-monger to his face, had not allowed himself a similar satisfaction with Colia.
  • The prince had enough to do in keeping the peace between the irritable Hippolyte and his mother, and eventually the former became so malicious and sarcastic on the subject of the approaching wedding, that Muishkin took offence at last, and refused to continue his visits.
  • But believe me, believe me, my simple-hearted friends, that in this highly moral verse, in this academical blessing to the world in general in the French language, is hidden the intensest gall and bitterness; but so well concealed is the venom, that I dare say the poet actually persuaded himself that his words were full of the tears of pardon and peace, instead of the bitterness of disappointment and malice, and so died in the delusion.
  • The general argued that it was only a whim of Aglaya’s; and that, had not Prince S. unfortunately made that remark, which had confused the child and made her blush, she never would have said what she did; and that he was sure Aglaya knew well that anything she might have heard of the prince and Nastasia Philipovna was merely the fabrication of malicious tongues, and that the woman was going to marry Rogojin.
  • Now you, sir, will you answer me or not?" he went on suddenly, gazing at Gania with ineffable malice.
  • As he carried Nastasia off, he turned and grinned horribly in the officer’s face, and with low malice observed: "Tfu! look what the fellow got!

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  • I am not interested in hearing malicious gossip.
  • Words can be like baseball bats when used maliciously.
    Sidney Madwed

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