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The Idiot
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The Idiot
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  • His calmness, however, was more apparent than real.
  • However, it was very soon apparent to anyone coming into the house, that Gania was the tyrant of the family.
  • She was hysterical, and laughed aloud every other minute with no apparent reason—the next moment relapsing into gloom and thoughtfulness.
  • "Well, I’ll tell you," said the prince, apparently in a deep reverie.
  • He gazed at Totski and the general with no apparent confusion, and with very little curiosity.
  • Rogojin went ahead of the others, talking to Ptitsin, and apparently insisting vehemently upon something very important.
  • On seeing the prince he became deadly white, and apparently fixed to the ground, so that he was more like a marble statue than a human being.
  • He held a bundle made up of an old faded silk handkerchief that apparently contained all his travelling wardrobe, and wore thick shoes and gaiters, his whole appearance being very un-Russian.
  • Nastasia Philipovna, who loved originality and drollery of all kinds, was apparently very fond of this old man, and rang the bell for more tea to stop his coughing.
  • They included a couple of young merchants, a man in a great-coat, a medical student, a little Pole, a small fat man who laughed continuously, and an enormously tall stout one who apparently put great faith in the strength of his fists.
  • His conviction was, apparently, unalterable.
  • "I like looking at that picture," muttered Rogojin, not noticing, apparently, that the prince had not answered his question.
  • And in the semi-darkness the prince distinguished a man standing close to the stairs, apparently waiting.
  • At this moment Vera came up to Lizabetha Prokofievna, carrying several large and beautifully bound books, apparently quite new.
  • You should hear the things he says sometimes, apparently in perfect seriousness.
  • Evgenie Pavlovitch continued some apparently extremely funny and interesting anecdote to Alexandra, speaking quickly and with much animation.
  • The news was apparently bad, as usual, for the woman began whimpering.
  • It was apparent now, when he entered, that he, was convinced that the moment for breaking the ice between them had come at last.
  • The reason for their anxiety soon became apparent.
  • If there were a little apparent awkwardness, it was only in his words and gestures.
  • Keller confessed, with apparent sincerity, to having been guilty of many acts of such a nature that it astonished the prince that he could mention them, even to him.
  • I confess I might well have resented that blind, deaf fate, which, with no apparent reason, seemed to have decided to crush me like a fly; but why did I not stop at resentment?
  • All present stood rooted to the earth with amazement at this unexpected and apparently uncalled-for outbreak; but the poor prince’s painful and rambling speech gave rise to a strange episode.
  • The next annoying circumstance was when an apparently strong and healthy young fellow, well dressed, and smiling, came forward to meet her on the terrace, instead of the half-dying unfortunate whom she had expected to see.
  • Every time that Aglaya showed temper (and this was very often), there was so much childish pouting, such "school-girlishness," as it were, in her apparent wrath, that it was impossible to avoid smiling at her, to her own unutterable indignation.
  • He turned his head towards her and glanced at her black and (for some reason) flashing eyes, tried to smile, and then, apparently forgetting her in an instant, turned to the right once more, and continued to watch the startling apparition before him.
  • Every one of them had heard the snap of the trigger, and yet they saw a live and apparently unharmed man before them.
  • At moments he would be apparently quite bright and happy; but as a rule he would sit moody and thoughtful.
  • As soon as he arrived this morning, he began to hold forth, beating his breast and apparently blaming himself for something.
  • Then suddenly he broke off and began to accuse the prince of something; he was apparently offended with him.
  • Lebedeff made a strange and very expressive grimace; he twisted about in his chair, and did something, apparently symbolical, with his hands.
  • When he did begin to speak, it was accidentally, in response to a question, and apparently without any special object.
  • Aglaya was quite alone, and dressed, apparently hastily, in a light mantle.
  • On entering she had merely glanced momentarily at her rival, and then had sat still, with her eyes on the ground, apparently in thought.
  • Princess Bielokonski had not returned to Moscow yet, and was apparently staying on for reasons of her own.
  • Apparently all was forgiven him.
  • Why had he flown into such transports of delight without any apparent reason?
  • In spite of his apparent outward composure, he was evidently in a state of great mental agitation.
  • But besides this, another trait in his character has become apparent, and as it is a good trait we will make haste to reveal it.
  • Had he been more careful to observe his companion, he would have seen that for the last quarter of an hour Aglaya had also been glancing around in apparent anxiety, as though she expected to see someone, or something particular, among the crowd of people.
  • No sooner had the carriage driven off than the door opened once more; and Rogojin, who had apparently been awaiting them, let them in and closed it after them.
  • But the sudden outbreak of song did not last; and for an hour afterwards the animated sound of apparently drunken conversation continued to be heard from above.
  • She did not blush as she said this; on the contrary, she grew pale, and started from her seat, apparently oblivious of what she did, and immediately sat down again.
  • He was disturbed in his mind, it seemed; perspiration stood in large drops on his forehead; in his gleaming eyes it was easy to read impatience and agitation; his gaze wandered from face to face of those present, and from object to object in the room, apparently without aim.
  • The rest of the guests (an old tutor or schoolmaster, goodness knows why invited; a young man, very timid, and shy and silent; a rather loud woman of about forty, apparently an actress; and a very pretty, well-dressed German lady who hardly said a word all the evening) not only had no gift for enlivening the proceedings, but hardly knew what to say for themselves when addressed.
  • She had quite recovered her temper; in fact, from certain signs, it was fair to conclude that she was delighted to see this joke going so far; and a careful observer might have remarked that her satisfaction dated from the moment when the fact of the prince’s confusion became apparent to all.
  • In the morning Rogojin had seemed to be trying to keep out of the way; but at the station this afternoon he had stood out, he had concealed himself, indeed, less than the prince himself; at the house, now, he had stood fifty yards off on the other side of the road, with folded hands, watching, plainly in view and apparently desirous of being seen.
  • The story was so artfully adorned with scandalous details, and persons of so great eminence and importance were apparently mixed up in it, while, at the same time, the evidence was so circumstantial, that it was no wonder the matter gave food for plenty of curiosity and gossip.
  • All this heated tirade, this outflow of passionate words and ecstatic ideas which seemed to hustle and tumble over each other as they fell from his lips, bore evidence of some unusually disturbed mental condition in the young fellow who had "boiled over" in such a remarkable manner, without any apparent reason.
  • WHILE he feasted his eyes upon Aglaya, as she talked merrily with Evgenie and Prince N., suddenly the old anglomaniac, who was talking to the dignitary in another corner of the room, apparently telling him a story about something or other—suddenly this gentleman pronounced the name of "Nicolai Andreevitch Pavlicheff" aloud.
  • We know also that he was not received at the Epanchins’ so long as they remained at Pavlofsk, and that he was not allowed an interview with Aglaya;—but next day he would set off once more on the same errand, apparently quite oblivious of the fact of yesterday’s visit having been a failure,—and, of course, meeting with another refusal.
  • I should think not!" said the general with annoyance, and apparently not in the least anxious to conceal it.
  • "Well, gentlemen!" she continued, gazing around in apparent astonishment; "what do you all look so alarmed about?
  • I will!" he yelled, apparently growing more and more intoxicated and excited.
  • What could have induced you to ask such a question?" she replied, quietly and seriously, and even, apparently, with some astonishment.
  • "I’ll just tell you one fact, ladies and gentlemen," continued the latter, with apparent seriousness and even exaltation of manner, but with a suggestion of "chaff" behind every word, as though he were laughing in his sleeve at his own nonsense—"a fact, the discovery of which, I believe, I may claim to have made by myself alone.

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  • The effects of the drought are apparent to anyone who sees the dry fields.
  • The committee investigated some apparent discrepancies.

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