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Crime and Punishment
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Crime and Punishment
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  • In spite of those strange words he felt very wretched.
  • That wretched nag was to drag all the cartload of them at a gallop!
  • To think of a wretched little beast like that trying to kick!
  • How despicably I fawned upon that wretched Ilya Petrovitch!
  • And only then were you comforted, and for the next twenty-four hours you held the wretched thing in your hand; we could not get it from you.
  • The student chattered on, saying that she had a sister Lizaveta, whom the wretched little creature was continually beating, and kept in complete bondage like a small child, though Lizaveta was at least six feet high.
  • What a wretched lodging you have, Rodya!
  • You’ve no evidence, you have only wretched rubbishly suspicions like Zametov’s!
  • Napoleon, the pyramids, Waterloo, and a wretched skinny old woman, a pawnbroker with a red trunk under her bed—it’s a nice hash for Porfiry Petrovitch to digest!
  • And those wretched Poles, ha-ha-ha!
  • The tavern was dirty and wretched, not even second-rate.
  • A chorus of wretched singers and a drunken but exceedingly depressed German clown from Munich with a red nose entertained the public.
  • At times, finding himself in a solitary and remote part of the town, in some wretched eating-house, sitting alone lost in thought, hardly knowing how he had come there, he suddenly thought of Svidrigailov.
  • The party consisted of the Pole, a wretched looking clerk with a spotty face and a greasy coat, who had not a word to say for himself, and smelt abominably, a deaf and almost blind old man who had once been in the post office and who had been from immemorial ages maintained by someone at Amalia Ivanovna’s.
  • Katerina Ivanovna was irritated too by the fact that hardly any of the lodgers invited had come to the funeral, except the Pole who had just managed to run into the cemetery, while to the memorial dinner the poorest and most insignificant of them had turned up, the wretched creatures, many of them not quite sober.
  • a poor student, unhinged by poverty and hypochondria, on the eve of a severe delirious illness (note that), suspicious, vain, proud, who has not seen a soul to speak to for six months, in rags and in boots without soles, has to face some wretched policemen and put up with their insolence; and the unexpected debt thrust under his nose, the I.O.U. presented by Tchebarov, the new paint, thirty degrees Reaumur and a stifling atmosphere, a crowd of people, the talk about the murder of a
  • It is very probable, too, that Katerina Ivanovna longed on this occasion, at the moment when she seemed to be abandoned by everyone, to show those "wretched contemptible lodgers" that she knew "how to do things, how to entertain" and that she had been brought up "in a genteel, she might almost say aristocratic colonel’s family" and had not been meant for sweeping floors and washing the children’s rags at night.
  • A wretched nag like that pulling such a cartload," said another.
  • Ah, I’ve been wretched at the thought of it all day!"

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  • The children were taken into protective custody due to their wretched living conditions.
  • The photograph showed poor people in a wretched village in East Africa.

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