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Crime and Punishment
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Crime and Punishment
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  • But you know, peasants live there, real rude Russian peasants.
  • She was a country peasant-woman and a very talkative one.
  • And a heavy shower of rain came on, too, and Dounia, insulted and put to shame, had to drive with a peasant in an open cart all the seventeen versts into town.
  • Peasants stood waiting within.
  • But his bride and her mother are to drive in a peasant’s cart covered with sacking (I know, I have been driven in it).
  • In that corner there was a dense crowd of peasants.
  • But the peasants took no notice of him; they were all shouting in groups together.
  • "Get in, get in!" shouted one of them, a young thick-necked peasant with a fleshy face red as a carrot.
  • Turning in at the gateway, he saw on the right a flight of stairs which a peasant was mounting with a book in his hand.
  • ’I’ve known this peasant, Nikolay Dementyev, from a child; he comes from the same province and district of Zaraisk, we are both Ryazan men.
  • At the entrance several people were standing, staring at the passers-by; the two porters, a peasant woman, a man in a long coat and a few others.
  • "He’s a rogue!" shouted the peasant woman.
  • "Why waste time talking to him?" cried the other porter, a huge peasant in a full open coat and with keys on his belt.
  • "They’re all generals’ daughters, it seems, but they have all snub noses," interposed a tipsy peasant with a sly smile on his face, wearing a loose coat.
  • A peasant called Dushkin, who keeps a dram-shop facing the house, brought to the police office a jeweller’s case containing some gold ear-rings, and told a long rigamarole.
  • And the peasants would beat them so cruelly, sometimes even about the nose and eyes, and he felt so sorry, so sorry for them that he almost cried, and his mother always used to take him away from the window.
  • All of a sudden there was a great uproar of shouting, singing and the balalaika, and from the tavern a number of big and very drunken peasants came out, wearing red and blue shirts and coats thrown over their shoulders.
  • But now, strange to say, in the shafts of such a cart he saw a thin little sorrel beast, one of those peasants’ nags which he had often seen straining their utmost under a heavy load of wood or hay, especially when the wheels were stuck in the mud or in a rut.
  • A peculiar circumstance attracted his attention: there seemed to be some kind of festivity going on, there were crowds of gaily dressed townspeople, peasant women, their husbands, and riff-raff of all sorts, all singing and all more or less drunk.
  • Because only peasants, or the most inexperienced novices deny everything flatly at examinations.
  • But you know, peasants live there, real rude Russian peasants.
  • A modern cultivated man would prefer prison to living with such strangers as our peasants.
  • It may be so with a simple peasant, but with one of our sort, an intelligent man cultivated on a certain side, it’s a dead certainty.
  • If he had only put his hand up to his cheek and leaned his head on one side he would have looked exactly like a peasant woman.
  • Every prisoner on trial, even the rudest peasant, knows that they begin by disarming him with irrelevant questions (as you so happily put it) and then deal him a knock-down blow, he-he-he!
  • What, you don’t admit that there are such fantastic people among the peasants?
  • The wooden cross, that is the peasant one; the copper one, that is Lizaveta’s—you will wear yourself, show me!
  • There’s a peasant woman with a baby, begging.
  • There were very few people in it this time—only a house porter and a peasant.
  • Before him stood the same peasant who had pushed by on the stairs.
  • An awful scene took place between them on the spot in the garden; Marfa Petrovna went so far as to strike Dounia, refused to hear anything and was shouting at her for a whole hour and then gave orders that Dounia should be packed off at once to me in a plain peasant’s cart, into which they flung all her things, her linen and her clothes, all pell-mell, without folding it up and packing it.
  • A peasant would run away, a fashionable dissenter would run away, the flunkey of another man’s thought, for you’ve only to show him the end of your little finger and he’ll be ready to believe in anything for the rest of his life.
  • The peasants have vodka, the educated young people, shut out from activity, waste themselves in impossible dreams and visions and are crippled by theories; Jews have sprung up and are amassing money, and all the rest give themselves up to debauchery.
  • And if this old woman, the pawnbroker, has been murdered by someone of a higher class in society—for peasants don’t pawn gold trinkets—how are we to explain this demoralisation of the civilised part of our society?"

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  • Most people in the Middle Ages were peasants.
  • In 1932 a peasant revolt in Su County China stopped collection of the poppy tax.

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