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pension
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Crime and Punishment
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pension
Used In
Crime and Punishment
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  • How could I help you out of my hundred and twenty roubles a year pension?
  • The fifteen roubles I sent you four months ago I borrowed, as you know, on security of my pension, from Vassily Ivanovitch Vahrushin a merchant of this town.
  • And you must be aware that her mother has to raise money on her pension for the journey.
  • Is she counting on what is left of her hundred and twenty roubles of pension when Afanasy Ivanovitch’s debt is paid?
  • They borrow on their hundred roubles pension.
  • But having given him the right to receive the pension, I had to wait till the debt was paid off and that is only just done, so that I’ve been unable to send you anything all this time.
  • Answer: there is, because he has a mother who would save her Rodya with her hundred and twenty-five roubles pension, if she has to starve herself; and a sister, too, who would go into bondage for his sake.
  • This uncle has got a capital of a thousand roubles, and he lives on his pension and has no need of that money.
  • Now that everyone has heard that Dounia is to marry Pyotr Petrovitch, my credit has suddenly improved and I know that Afanasy Ivanovitch will trust me now even to seventy-five roubles on the security of my pension, so that perhaps I shall be able to send you twenty-five or even thirty roubles.
  • And she is dreaming of a pension already, he-he-he!
  • "He’s been stagnating all his life as a district postmaster; gets a little pension.
  • It needed the utmost delicacy, the greatest nicety, but she has managed things so that that fool, that conceited baggage, that provincial nonentity, simply because she is the widow of a major, and has come to try and get a pension and to fray out her skirts in the government offices, because at fifty she paints her face (everybody knows it)…. a creature like that did not think fit to come, and has not even answered the invitation, which the most ordinary good manners required!
  • …Luzhin, for instance, who might be said to be the most respectable of all the lodgers, did not appear, though Katerina Ivanovna had the evening before told all the world, that is Amalia Ivanovna, Polenka, Sonia and the Pole, that he was the most generous, noble-hearted man with a large property and vast connections, who had been a friend of her first husband’s, and a guest in her father’s house, and that he had promised to use all his influence to secure her a considerable pension.
  • "Allow me to ask," Sonia rose to her feet, "did you say something to her yesterday of the possibility of a pension?
  • )" Regaining her good-humour, Katerina Ivanovna began at once telling Raskolnikov that when she had obtained her pension, she intended to open a school for the daughters of gentlemen in her native town T——.

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  • Between Social Security and a good company pension, my grandparents are reasonably comfortable.
  • Pension, I think.
    Harper Lee  --  Go Set a Watchman

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