To better see all uses of the word
apparent
in
Crime and Punishment
please enable javascript.

apparent
Used In
Crime and Punishment
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • Meanwhile Katerina Ivanovna apparently heard nothing.
  • And he sank down on the bench exhausted, and helpless, looking at no one, apparently oblivious of his surroundings and plunged in deep thought.
  • The innkeeper came down from the upper room, apparently on purpose to listen to the "funny fellow" and sat down at a little distance, yawning lazily, but with dignity.
  • The woman seeing a stranger stopped indifferently facing him, coming to herself for a moment and apparently wondering what he had come for.
  • "That’s been proved," said Razumihin with apparent reluctance, frowning.
  • There was a smile on his lips, and a new shade of irritable impatience was apparent in that smile.
  • He, too, would apparently have liked to approach the girl with some object of his own.
  • The flat underneath the old woman’s was apparently empty also; the visiting card nailed on the door had been torn off—they had gone away!
  • "What do you want?" he shouted, apparently astonished that such a ragged fellow was not annihilated by the majesty of his glance.
  • At the end of the court, the corner of a low, smutty, stone shed, apparently part of some workshop, peeped from behind the hoarding.
  • On the ground a man who had been run over lay apparently unconscious, and covered with blood; he was very badly dressed, but not like a workman.
  • In manner he was slow and, as it were, nonchalant, and at the same time studiously free and easy; he made efforts to conceal his self-importance, but it was apparent at every instant.
  • He overtook the girl at the seat, but, on reaching it, she dropped down on it, in the corner; she let her head sink on the back of the seat and closed her eyes, apparently in extreme exhaustion.
  • The question why he was now going to Razumihin agitated him even more than he was himself aware; he kept uneasily seeking for some sinister significance in this apparently ordinary action.
  • The other, a very stout, buxom woman with a purplish-red, blotchy face, excessively smartly dressed with a brooch on her bosom as big as a saucer, was standing on one side, apparently waiting for something.
  • He held out his hand and shook hands, still apparently making desperate efforts to subdue his mirth and utter a few words to introduce himself.
  • "I rarely lie," answered Svidrigailov thoughtfully, apparently not noticing the rudeness of the question.
  • Pyotr Petrovitch had apparently not at all expected such a conclusion.
  • But he stood in the waiting-room, and people, who apparently had nothing to do with him, were continually passing to and fro before him.
  • He was apparently so taken up with Nikolay that for a moment he had forgotten Raskolnikov.
  • For an instant there was no answer, but it was evident that there were several persons at the door, and that they were apparently pushing somebody back.
  • Porfiry repeated, apparently incensed, but preserving a good-humoured and ironical face, as though he were not in the least concerned at Raskolnikov’s opinion of him.
  • At the first glance it was apparent that he had had a great deal to drink and, though no amount of liquor made Razumihin quite drunk, this time he was perceptibly affected by it.
  • A minute later Sonia, too, came in with the candle, set down the candlestick and, completely disconcerted, stood before him inexpressibly agitated and apparently frightened by his unexpected visit.
  • He met his visitor with an apparently genial and good-tempered air, and it was only after a few minutes that Raskolnikov saw signs of a certain awkwardness in him, as though he had been thrown out of his reckoning or caught in something very secret.
  • Avdotya Romanovna was remarkably good looking; she was tall, strikingly well-proportioned, strong and self-reliant—the latter quality was apparent in every gesture, though it did not in the least detract from the grace and softness of her movements.
  • "No!" he said, apparently abandoning all attempt to keep up appearances with Porfiry, "it’s not worth it, I don’t care about lessening the sentence!"
  • He was apparently excited and uneasy in anticipation of something.
  • Under the window there must have been something like a garden, and apparently a pleasure garden.
  • "And you want nothing else?" he asked with apparent surprise.
  • I merely hinted at her obtaining temporary assistance as the widow of an official who had died in the service—if only she has patronage…. but apparently your late parent had not served his full term and had not indeed been in the service at all of late.
  • Katerina Ivanovna rose from her chair, and with a stern and apparently calm voice (though she was pale and her chest was heaving) observed that "if she dared for one moment to set her contemptible wretch of a father on a level with her papa, she, Katerina Ivanovna, would tear her cap off her head and trample it under foot."
  • "Listen, Razumihin," Raskolnikov began quietly, apparently calm—"can’t you see that I don’t want your benevolence?
  • What does it mean?" cried Porfiry Petrovitch, apparently quite frightened.
  • "No matter, sir, no matter!" he went on hurriedly and with apparent composure when both the boys at the counter guffawed and even the innkeeper smiled—"No matter, I am not confounded by the wagging of their heads; for everyone knows everything about it already, and all that is secret is made open.
  • Lead the way," she said with apparent composure, but her face was very pale.
  • There’s no hurry, there’s no hurry," muttered Porfiry Petrovitch, moving to and fro about the table without any apparent aim, as it were making dashes towards the window, the bureau and the table, at one moment avoiding Raskolnikov’s suspicious glance, then again standing still and looking him straight in the face.

  • There are no more uses of "apparent" in the book.


    Show samples from other sources
  • The effects of the drought are apparent to anyone who sees the dry fields.
  • The committee investigated some apparent discrepancies.

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading