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scurvy
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Don Quixote
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scurvy
Used In
Don Quixote
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  • "You are a stupid, scurvy innkeeper," said Don Quixote, and putting spurs to Rocinante and bringing his pike to the slope he rode out of the inn before anyone could stop him, and pushed on some distance without looking to see if his squire was following him.
  • It’s another sort of cat they must throw in my face, and not that poor scurvy knave.
  • "Do you think," he said to him after a pause, "you scurvy clown, that you are to be always interfering with me, and that you are to be always offending and I always pardoning?

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  • The slang term, "limey" to describe someone who is British, arose because of the British navy’s use of limes to prevent scurvy.
  • "The scurvy," Nathan interjected, "she means she’d had the scurvy, which was cured as soon as the Russians took over—"
    William Styron  --  Sophie’s Choice

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