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gall
in
Don Quixote
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gall -- as in: had the gall to
Used In
Don Quixote
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  • Within an ace of being Count was he, And would have been but for the spite and gall Of this vile age, mean and illiberal, That cannot even let a donkey be.
  • And I would give thee pearls that should As big as oak-galls show; So matchless big that each might well Be called the great "Alone."
  • It ought to have been enough for you, ye scoundrels, to have changed the pearls of my lady’s eyes into oak galls, and her hair of purest gold into the bristles of a red ox’s tail, and in short, all her features from fair to foul, without meddling with her smell; for by that we might somehow have found out what was hidden underneath that ugly rind; though, to tell the truth, I never perceived her ugliness, but only her beauty, which was raised to the highest pitch of perfection by a

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  • She had the gall to ask for a raise.
  • all the greed and all the gall Is boiled away for once and all.
    Roald Dahl  --  Charlie And The Chocolate Factory

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