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soliloquy
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Don Quixote
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soliloquy
Used In
Don Quixote
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  • Such was the soliloquy Sancho held with himself, and all the conclusion he could come to was to say to himself again, "Well, there’s remedy for everything except death, under whose yoke we have all to pass, whether we like it or not, when life’s finished.
  • Don Quixote roused him from these reflections and this soliloquy by saying, "No doubt, Senor Don Diego de Miranda, you set me down in your mind as a fool and a madman, and it would be no wonder if you did, for my deeds do not argue anything else.

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  • Perhaps the best known soliloquy is written by Shakespeare in Hamlet:  "To be, or not to be: that is the question..."
  • By the end of his soliloquy Hamlet concludes that he should not murder Duncan.

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