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philistine
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Don Quixote
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philistine
Used In
Don Quixote
Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
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  • If you mention any giant in your book contrive that it shall be the giant Goliath, and with this alone, which will cost you almost nothing, you have a grand note, for you can put—The giant Golias or Goliath was a Philistine whom the shepherd David slew by a mighty stone-cast in the Terebinth valley, as is related in the Book of Kings—in the chapter where you find it written.
  • "With regard to giants," replied Don Quixote, "opinions differ as to whether there ever were any or not in the world; but the Holy Scripture, which cannot err by a jot from the truth, shows us that there were, when it gives us the history of that big Philistine, Goliath, who was seven cubits and a half in height, which is a huge size.

  • There are no more uses of "philistine" in the book.


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  • a philistine who cares only about making money
  • Babbitt is a philistine with a sense that something is missing in life.

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