To better see all uses of the word
Don Quixote
please enable javascript.

Used In
Don Quixote
Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • The mighty cork trees, unenforced save of their own courtesy, shed the broad light bark that served at first to roof the houses supported by rude stakes, a protection against the inclemency of heaven alone.
  • …on his miserable pay, which comes late or never, or else on what he can plunder, seriously imperilling his life and conscience; and sometimes his nakedness will be so great that a slashed doublet serves him for uniform and shirt, and in the depth of winter he has to defend himself against the inclemency of the weather in the open field with nothing better than the breath of his mouth, which I need not say, coming from an empty place, must come out cold, contrary to the laws of nature.
  • With the knights of these days, for the most part, it is the damask, brocade, and rich stuffs they wear, that rustle as they go, not the chain mail of their armour; no knight now-a-days sleeps in the open field exposed to the inclemency of heaven, and in full panoply from head to foot; no one now takes a nap, as they call it, without drawing his feet out of the stirrups, and leaning upon his lance, as the knights-errant used to do; no one now, issuing from the wood, penetrates yonder…
  • …fulfil the duties that are especially his; but let the knight-errant explore the corners of the earth and penetrate the most intricate labyrinths, at each step let him attempt impossibilities, on desolate heaths let him endure the burning rays of the midsummer sun, and the bitter inclemency of the winter winds and frosts; let no lions daunt him, no monsters terrify him, no dragons make him quail; for to seek these, to attack those, and to vanquish all, are in truth his main duties.

  • There are no more uses of "inclement" in the book.

    Show samples from other sources
  • Despite the difficulties, the inclement weather did not end our journey.
  • But since the weather had been so inclement—to use one of Reverend Ambrose’s words—they had had more time for practice.
    Ernest J. Gaines  --  A Lesson Before Dying

  • Go to more samples
Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading