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Don Quixote
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Don Quixote
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  • O lady, deign to hold in remembrance this heart, thy vassal, that thus in anguish pines for love of thee.
  • Let this new Samson remain in his own country, and, bringing honour to it, bring honour at the same time on the grey heads of his venerable parents; for I will be content with any squire that comes to hand, as Sancho does not deign to accompany me.
  • …story, he says that as soon as Don Quixote had ensconced himself in the forest, oak grove, or wood near El Toboso, he bade Sancho return to the city, and not come into his presence again without having first spoken on his behalf to his lady, and begged of her that it might be her good pleasure to permit herself to be seen by her enslaved knight, and deign to bestow her blessing upon him, so that he might thereby hope for a happy issue in all his encounters and difficult enterprises.
  • The cavalier who had addressed Don Quixote again approached him and said, "Come with us, Senor Don Quixote, for we are all of us your servants and great friends of Roque Guinart’s;" to which Don Quixote returned, "If courtesy breeds courtesy, yours, sir knight, is daughter or very nearly akin to the great Roque’s; carry me where you please; I will have no will but yours, especially if you deign to employ it in your service."
  • "I do deign," said Sancho, deeply moved and with tears in his eyes; "it shall not be said of me, master mine," he continued, " ’the bread eaten and the company dispersed.’

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  • She wouldn’t deign to meet with me.
  • Will your majesty deign to excuse me?
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Count of Monte Cristo

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