To better see all uses of the word
incline
in
The Winter's Tale
please enable javascript.

Go to New Version of This Page
This old version has not been updated since 2016,
but we're leaving it in case you prefer it.
Show What's New
Please update your links from the new version.
incline
Used In
The Winter's Tale
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Play Vocabulary

as in: on an incline or incline his head Define
to be at an angle or to bend
  • It is; you lie, you lie: I say thou liest, Camillo, and I hate thee; Pronounce thee a gross lout, a mindless slave; Or else a hovering temporizer, that Canst with thine eyes at once see good and evil, Inclining to them both.
  • I appeal To your own conscience, sir, before Polixenes Came to your court, how I was in your grace, How merited to be so; since he came, With what encounter so uncurrent I Have strain’d t’ appear thus: if one jot beyond The bound of honour, or in act or will That way inclining, harden’d be the hearts Of all that hear me, and my near’st of kin Cry fie upon my grave!

  • There are no more uses of "incline" identified with this meaning in the play.

    Show samples from other sources
  • I climbed down the incline.
  • She inclined her head to indicate her agreement.

  • Go to more samples

To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: I'm inclined to Define
a tendency; in the mood; or an attitude that favors something
as in: on an incline or incline his head Define
to be at an angle or to bend
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Play Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading