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scurvy
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Othello, the Moor of Venice
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scurvy
Used In
Othello, the Moor of Venice
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  • Nay, but he prated, And spoke such scurvy and provoking terms Against your honor, That, with the little godliness I have, I did full hard forbear him.
  • I cannot go to, man; nor ’tis not very well: nay, I say ’tis very scurvy, and begin to find myself fobbed in it.
  • The Moor’s abused by some most villainous knave, Some base notorious knave, some scurvy fellow:— O heaven, that such companions thou’dst unfold, And put in every honest hand a whip To lash the rascals naked through the world Even from the east to the west!

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  • The slang term, "limey" to describe someone who is British, arose because of the British navy’s use of limes to prevent scurvy.
  • "The scurvy," Nathan interjected, "she means she’d had the scurvy, which was cured as soon as the Russians took over—"
    William Styron  --  Sophie’s Choice

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