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poise
in
Othello, the Moor of Venice
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poise
Used In
Othello, the Moor of Venice
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  • If the balance of our lives had not one scale of reason to poise another of sensuality, the blood and baseness of our natures would conduct us to most preposterous conclusions: But we have reason to cool our raging motions, our carnal stings, our unbitted lusts; whereof I take this, that you call love, to be a sect or scion.
  • Why, this is not a boon; ’tis as I should entreat you wear your gloves, Or feed on nourishing dishes, or keep you warm, Or sue to you to do a peculiar profit To your own person: nay, when I have a suit Wherein I mean to touch your love indeed, It shall be full of poise and difficult weight, And fearful to be granted.

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  • She has great charm and great poise.
  • The once self-conscious girl is now a woman with considerable poise.

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