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conceit
in
Othello, the Moor of Venice
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conceit -- as in: confident, but not conceited
Used In
Othello, the Moor of Venice
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  • And didst contract and purse thy brow together, As if thou then hadst shut up in thy brain Some horrible conceit: if thou dost love me, Show me thy thought.
  • The Moor already changes with my poison: Dangerous conceits are in their natures poisons, Which at the first are scarce found to distaste, But, with a little act upon the blood, Burn like the mines of sulphur.
  • I do beseech you,— Though I perchance am vicious in my guess, As, I confess, it is my nature’s plague To spy into abuses, and of my jealousy Shape faults that are not,—that your wisdom yet, From one that so imperfectly conceits, Would take no notice; nor build yourself a trouble Out of his scattering and unsure observance:— It were not for your quiet nor your good, Nor for my manhood, honesty, or wisdom, To let you know my thoughts.

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  • Her conceit will be her downfall.
  • Even misfortune didn’t diminish her conceit.

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