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tempest
in
Othello, the Moor of Venice
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tempest
Used In
Othello, the Moor of Venice
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  • The desperate tempest hath so bang’d the Turks That their designment halts; a noble ship of Venice Hath seen a grievous wreck and sufferance On most part of their fleet.
  • If after every tempest come such calms, May the winds blow till they have waken’d death!
  • But this same Cassio,—though he speak of comfort Touching the Turkish loss,—yet he looks sadly, And prays the Moor be safe; for they were parted With foul and violent tempest.
  • He has had most favourable and happy speed: Tempests themselves, high seas, and howling winds, The gutter’d rocks, and congregated sands,— Traitors ensteep’d to clog the guiltless keel,— As having sense of beauty, do omit Their mortal natures, letting go safely by The divine Desdemona.

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  • a tempest swept over the island
  • Shakespeare’s The Tempest features a storm created by the character, Prospero.

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