To better see all uses of the word
Othello, the Moor of Venice
please enable javascript.

Used In
Othello, the Moor of Venice
Go to Play Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • what malice was between you?
  • But what praise couldst thou bestow on a deserving woman indeed,—one that, in the authority of her merit, did justly put on the vouch of very malice itself?
  • The worser welcome: I have charged thee not to haunt about my doors; In honest plainness thou hast heard me say My daughter is not for thee; and now, in madness, Being full of supper and distempering draughts, Upon malicious bravery dost thou come To start my quiet.
  • What, man! there are ways to recover the general again: you are but now cast in his mood, a punishment more in policy than in malice; even so as one would beat his offenceless dog to affright an imperious lion: sue to him again, and he is yours.
  • —I pray you, in your letters, When you shall these unlucky deeds relate, Speak of me as I am; nothing extenuate, Nor set down aught in malice: then must you speak Of one that loved not wisely, but too well; Of one not easily jealous, but, being wrought, Perplex’d in the extreme; of one whose hand, Like the base Judean, threw a pearl away Richer than all his tribe; of one whose subdu’d eyes, Albeit unused to the melting mood, Drop tears as fast as the Arabian trees Their medicinal gum.

  • There are no more uses of "malicious" in the play.

    Show samples from other sources
  • I am not interested in hearing malicious gossip.
  • Words can be like baseball bats when used maliciously.
    Sidney Madwed

  • Go to more samples
Go to Play Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading