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Much Ado About Nothing
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Much Ado About Nothing
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  • He is of a very melancholy disposition.
  • Then half Signior Benedick’s tongue in Count John’s mouth, and half Count John’s melancholy in Signior Benedick’s face,— BEATRICE.
  • I found him here as melancholy as a lodge in a warren.
  • Do, do: he’ll but break a comparison or two on me; which, peradventure not marked or not laughed at, strikes him into melancholy; and then there’s a partridge wing saved, for the fool will eat no supper that night.
  • There’s little of the melancholy element in her, my lord: she is never sad but when she sleeps; and not ever sad then, for I have heard my daughter say, she hath often dreamed of unhappiness and waked herself with laughing.
  • The greatest note of it is his melancholy.
  • We have been up and down to seek thee; for we are high-proof melancholy, and would fain have it beaten away.

  • There are no more uses of "melancholy" in the play.

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  • Since her dog died she’s been in a melancholy mood.
  • This weather makes me melancholy. I can’t wait for spring,

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