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Much Ado About Nothing
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Much Ado About Nothing
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  • Courtesy itself must convert to disdain if you come in her presence.
  • That I was disdainful, and that I had my good wit out of the ’Hundred Merry Tales.’
  • What! my dear Lady Disdain, are you yet living?
  • Is it possible Disdain should die while she hath such meet food to feed it as Signior Benedick?
  • I had rather be a canker in a hedge than a rose in his grace; and it better fits my blood to be disdained of all than to fashion a carriage to rob love from any: in this, though I cannot be said to be a flattering honest man, it must not be denied but I am a plain-dealing villain.
  • I know he doth deserve As much as may be yielded to a man; But nature never fram’d a woman’s heart Of prouder stuff than that of Beatrice; Disdain and scorn ride sparkling in her eyes, Misprising what they look on, and her wit Values itself so highly, that to her All matter else seems weak.
  • ] No, truly, Ursula, she is too disdainful; I know her spirits are as coy and wild As haggards of the rock.

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  • She tries to be polite, but cannot hide her disdain for authority.
  • She has nothing but disdain for the notion that common people can regulate their own lives better than she can.

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