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spurn
in
A Midsummer Night's Dream
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spurn
Used In
A Midsummer Night's Dream
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  • I am your spaniel; and, Demetrius, The more you beat me, I will fawn on you: Use me but as your spaniel, spurn me, strike me, Neglect me, lose me; only give me leave, Unworthy as I am, to follow you.
  • And made your other love, Demetrius,— Who even but now did spurn me with his foot,— To call me goddess, nymph, divine, and rare, Precious, celestial?
  • I evermore did love you, Hermia; Did ever keep your counsels; never wrong’d you; Save that, in love unto Demetrius, I told him of your stealth unto this wood: He follow’d you; for love I follow’d him; But he hath chid me hence, and threaten’d me To strike me, spurn me, nay, to kill me too: And now, so you will let me quiet go, To Athens will I bear my folly back, And follow you no farther.

  • There are no more uses of "spurn" in the play.


    Show samples from other sources
  • Her father—spurned and rejected and lovelorn?
    Margaret Peterson Haddix  --  Uprising
  • I wanted to spurn the Herondale name because I thought I hated my father, but I don’t hate him.
    Cassandra Clare  --  City of Heavenly Fire

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