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contagion
in
A Midsummer Night's Dream
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contagion
Used In
A Midsummer Night's Dream
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  • Therefore the winds, piping to us in vain, As in revenge, have suck’d up from the sea Contagious fogs; which, falling in the land, Hath every pelting river made so proud That they have overborne their continents: The ox hath therefore stretch’d his yoke in vain, The ploughman lost his sweat; and the green corn Hath rotted ere his youth attain’d a beard: The fold stands empty in the drowned field, And crows are fatted with the murrion flock; The nine men’s morris is fill’d up with mud;

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  • Following the French Revolution, a contagion of upheaval spread across Europe.
  • One of the tragedies for AIDS patients is the irrational fear of contagion through casual contact.

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