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mockery
in
The Merchant of Venice
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mockery
Used In
The Merchant of Venice
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  • In truth, I know it is a sin to be a mocker, but he! why, he hath a horse better than the Neapolitan’s, a better bad habit of frowning than the Count Palatine; he is every man in no man.
  • He hath disgrac’d me and hind’red me half a million; laugh’d at my losses, mock’d at my gains, scorned my nation, thwarted my bargains, cooled my friends, heated mine enemies.
  • By this scimitar,— That slew the Sophy and a Persian prince, That won three fields of Sultan Solyman,— I would o’erstare the sternest eyes that look, Outbrave the heart most daring on the earth, Pluck the young sucking cubs from the she-bear, Yea, mock the lion when he roars for prey, To win thee, lady.

  • There are no more uses of "mockery" in the play.


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  • I will not permit the defendant to make a mockery of this trial.
  • Abuses at Abu Ghraib made a mockery of American idealism.

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