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conceit
in
The Merchant of Venice
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conceit -- as in: confident, but not conceited
Used In
The Merchant of Venice
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  • Madam, although I speak it in your presence, You have a noble and a true conceit Of godlike amity, which appears most strongly In bearing thus the absence of your lord.
  • I tell thee what, Antonio— I love thee, and ’tis my love that speaks— There are a sort of men whose visages Do cream and mantle like a standing pond, And do a wilful stillness entertain, With purpose to be dress’d in an opinion Of wisdom, gravity, profound conceit; As who should say ’I am Sir Oracle, And when I ope my lips let no dog bark.’
  • For the table, sir, it shall be served in; for the meat, sir, it shall be covered; for your coming in to dinner, sir, why, let it be as humours and conceits shall govern.

  • There are no more uses of "conceit" in the play.


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  • Her conceit will be her downfall.
  • Even misfortune didn’t diminish her conceit.

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