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The Merchant of Venice
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Used In
The Merchant of Venice
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  • Look on beauty And you shall see ’tis purchas’d by the weight: Which therein works a miracle in nature, Making them lightest that wear most of it: So are those crisped snaky golden locks Which make such wanton gambols with the wind, Upon supposed fairness, often known To be the dowry of a second head, The skull that bred them, in the sepulchre.
  • The reason is, your spirits are attentive; For do but note a wild and wanton herd, Or race of youthful and unhandled colts, Fetching mad bounds, bellowing and neighing loud, Which is the hot condition of their blood; If they but hear perchance a trumpet sound, Or any air of music touch their ears, You shall perceive them make a mutual stand, Their savage eyes turn’d to a modest gaze By the sweet power of music: therefore the poet Did feign that Orpheus drew trees, stones, and floods;

  • There are no more uses of "wanton" in the play.

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  • She is known for wanton behavior.
  • The ability to see beauty is the beginning of our moral sensibility. What we believe is beautiful we will not wantonly destroy.
    Reverend Sean Parker Dennison

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