To better see all uses of the word
Henry IV, Part 2
please enable javascript.

Used In
Henry IV, Part 2
Go to Play Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • Hence, therefore, thou nice crutch!
  • Marry, my lord, Althaea dreamt she was delivered of a fire-brand; and therefore I call him her dream.
  • Therefore be merry, coz; since sudden sorrow Serves to say thus, "some good thing comes tomorrow."
  • God’s light, these villains will make the word as odious as the word "occupy;" which was an excellent good word before it was ill sorted: therefore captains had need look to’t.
  • ’tis very true: And therefore be assured, my good lord marshal, If we do now make our atonement well, Our peace will, like a broken limb united, Grow stronger for the breaking.
  • If I do sweat, they are the drops of thy lovers, and they weep for thy death: therefore rouse up fear and trembling, and do observance to my mercy.
  • The knave is mine honest friend, sir; therefore, I beseech your worship, let him be countenanced.
  • Why then, lament therefore.
  • Therefore, my Harry, Be it thy course to busy giddy minds With foreign quarrels; that action, hence borne out, May waste the memory of the former days.
  • It is certain that either wise bearing or ignorant carriage is caught, as men take diseases, one of another: therefore let men take heed of their company.
  • You are right, justice, and you weigh this well; Therefore still bear the balance and the sword: And I do wish your honours may increase, Till you do live to see a son of mine Offend you and obey you, as I did.
  • His temper, therefore, must be well observed: Chide him for faults, and do it reverently, When you perceive his blood inclined to mirth; But, being moody, give him line and scope, Till that his passions, like a whale on ground, Confound themselves with working.
  • Most subject is the fattest soil to weeds; And he, the noble image of my youth, Is overspread with them: therefore my grief Stretches itself beyond the hour of death: The blood weeps from my heart when I do shape In forms imaginary the unguided days And rotten times that you shall look upon When I am sleeping with my ancestors.
  • …before Master Tisick, the debuty, t’other day; and, as he said to me, ’twas no longer ago than Wednesday last, "I’ good faith, neighbour Quickly," says he; Master Dumbe, our minister, was by then; "neighbour Quickly," says he, "receive those that are civil; for" said he "you are in an ill name:" now a’ said so, I can tell whereupon; "for," says he, "you are an honest woman, and well thought on; therefore take heed what guests you receive: receive," says he, "no swaggering companions."
  • Note this; the king is weary Of dainty and such picking grievances: For he hath found to end one doubt by death Revives two greater in the heirs of life, And therefore will he wipe his tables clean And keep no tell-tale to his memory That may repeat and history his loss To new remembrance; for full well he knows He cannot so precisely weed this land As his misdoubts present occasion: His foes are so enrooted with his friends That, plucking to unfix an enemy, He doth unfasten so and…
  • He loves thee, and thou dost neglect him, Thomas; Thou hast a better place in his affection Than all thy brothers: cherish it, my boy, And noble offices thou mayst effect Of mediation, after I am dead, Between his greatness and thy other brethren: Therefore omit him not; blunt not his love, Nor lose the good advantage of his grace By seeming cold or careless of his will; For he is gracious, if he be observed.
  • Coming to look on you, thinking you dead, And dead almost, my liege, to think you were, I spake unto this crown as having sense, And thus upbraided it: "The care on thee depending Hath fed upon the body of my father; Therefore, thou best of gold art worst of gold: Other, less fine in carat, is more precious, Preserving life in medicine potable; But thou, most fine, most honour’d, most renown’d, Hast eat thy bearer up."
  • …let it be booked with the rest of this day’s deeds; or, by the Lord, I will have it in a particular ballad else, with mine own picture on the top on’t, Colevile kissing my foot: to the which course if I be enforced, if you do not all show like gilt twopences to me, and I in the clear sky of fame o’ershine you as much as the full moon doth the cinders of the element, which show like pins’ heads to her, believe not the word of the noble: therefore let me have right, and let desert mount.

  • There are no more uses of "therefore" in the play.

    Show samples from other sources
  • Kim is taller than Ashley. Ashley is taller than Anna. Therefore, Kim is taller than Anna.
  • It has not been approved for use in this country. Therefore, you cannot buy it here.

  • Go to more samples
Go to Play Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading