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heed
in
Henry IV, Part 2
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heed
Used In
Henry IV, Part 2
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  • Alas the day! take heed of him; he stabbed me in mine own house, and that most beastly: in good faith, he cares not what mischief he does, if his weapon be out: he will foin like any devil; he will spare neither man, woman, nor child.
  • It is certain that either wise bearing or ignorant carriage is caught, as men take diseases, one of another: therefore let men take heed of their company.
  • …before Master Tisick, the debuty, t’other day; and, as he said to me, ’twas no longer ago than Wednesday last, "I’ good faith, neighbour Quickly," says he; Master Dumbe, our minister, was by then; "neighbour Quickly," says he, "receive those that are civil; for" said he "you are in an ill name:" now a’ said so, I can tell whereupon; "for," says he, "you are an honest woman, and well thought on; therefore take heed what guests you receive: receive," says he, "no swaggering companions."

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  • Heed the advice of the old women.
  • She did not heed his warning.

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