To better see all uses of the word
positive
in
Sense and Sensibility
please enable javascript.

positive
Used In
Sense and Sensibility
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Book Vocabulary

unspecified meaning
  • I must do THIS justice to Mr. Willoughby—he has broken no positive engagement with my sister.
  • No positive engagement indeed! after taking her all over Allenham House, and fixing on the very rooms they were to live in hereafter!

  • Show more
  • Mrs. Jennings left them earlier than usual; for she could not be easy till the Middletons and Palmers were able to grieve as much as herself; and positively refusing Elinor’s offered attendance, went out alone for the rest of the morning.
  • Elinor’s satisfaction, at the moment of removal, was more positive.
  • Had both the children been there, the affair might have been determined too easily by measuring them at once; but as Harry only was present, it was all conjectural assertion on both sides; and every body had a right to be equally positive in their opinion, and to repeat it over and over again as often as they liked.
  • Elinor contradicted it, however, very positively; and by relating that she had herself been employed in conveying the offer from Colonel Brandon to Edward, and, therefore, must understand the terms on which it was given, obliged him to submit to her authority.
  • The name of Willoughby, John Willoughby, frequently repeated, first caught my attention; and what followed was a positive assertion that every thing was now finally settled respecting his marriage with Miss Grey—it was no longer to be a secret—it would take place even within a few weeks, with many particulars of preparations and other matters.
  • This picture, she had allowed herself to believe, might have been accidentally obtained; it might not have been Edward’s gift; but a correspondence between them by letter, could subsist only under a positive engagement, could be authorised by nothing else; for a few moments, she was almost overcome—her heart sunk within her, and she could hardly stand; but exertion was indispensably necessary; and she struggled so resolutely against the oppression of her feelings, that her success was…
  • Elinor avoided it upon principle, as tending to fix still more upon her thoughts, by the too warm, too positive assurances of Marianne, that belief of Edward’s continued affection for herself which she rather wished to do away; and Marianne’s courage soon failed her, in trying to converse upon a topic which always left her more dissatisfied with herself than ever, by the comparison it necessarily produced between Elinor’s conduct and her own.
  • …the readiness of the house, to which Colonel Brandon, with an eager desire for the accommodation of Elinor, was making considerable improvements; and after waiting some time for their completion, after experiencing, as usual, a thousand disappointments and delays from the unaccountable dilatoriness of the workmen, Elinor, as usual, broke through the first positive resolution of not marrying till every thing was ready, and the ceremony took place in Barton church early in the autumn.

  • There are no more uses of "positive" in the book.


To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: I'm absolutely positive! Define
certain (having no doubt)
as in: had a positive effect Define
good or beneficial
as in: positive feedback from my boss Define
approval or agreement
as in: a positive attitude Define
optimistic or agreeable
as in: The test came back positive. Define
found a condition or substance to be present
as in: a positive number Define
greater than zero (of a number)
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading