To better see all uses of the word
acquit
in
Sense and Sensibility
please enable javascript.

acquit
Used In
Sense and Sensibility
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Book Vocabulary

unspecified meaning
  • —I am happy—and he is acquitted.
  • My feelings are at present in a state of dreadful indecision; I wish to acquit you, but certainty on either side will be ease to what I now suffer.

  • Show more
  • Cruel, cruel—nothing can acquit you.
  • Sometimes she could believe Willoughby to be as unfortunate and as innocent as herself, and at others, lost every consolation in the impossibility of acquitting him.
  • I acquit Edward of essential misconduct.
  • Willoughby, "poor Willoughby," as she now allowed herself to call him, was constantly in her thoughts; she would not but have heard his vindication for the world, and now blamed, now acquitted herself for having judged him so harshly before.
  • "I have been more pained," said she, "by her endeavors to acquit him than by all the rest; for it irritates her mind more than the most perfect conviction of his unworthiness can do.

  • There are no more uses of "acquit" in the book.


To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: she was acquitted Define
officially find "not guilty" of criminal charges
as in: she acquitted herself well Define
to handle yourself well in a given situation
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading