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countenance
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Sense and Sensibility
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countenance
Used In
Sense and Sensibility
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as in: a pleasant countenance Define
facial expression; or face; or composure
  • Marianne remained perfectly silent, though her countenance betrayed her interest in what was said.

  • There are no more uses of "countenance" identified with this meaning, but check unspecified meaning below.

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  • She has a pleasant countenance.
  • Her countenance grew stern.

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unspecified meaning
  • His countenance was thoroughly good-humoured; and his manners were as friendly as the style of his letter.
  • He turned round on their coming in, and his countenance shewed that he strongly partook of the emotion which over-powered Marianne.

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  • In about half an hour her mother returned, and though her eyes were red, her countenance was not uncheerful.
  • Marianne’s countenance was more communicative.
  • Elinor could hardly keep her countenance as she assented to the hardship of such an obligation.
  • Elinor DID think the question a very odd one, and her countenance expressed it, as she answered that she had never seen Mrs. Ferrars.
  • At first sight, his address is certainly not striking; and his person can hardly be called handsome, till the expression of his eyes, which are uncommonly good, and the general sweetness of his countenance, is perceived.
  • Lucy here looked up; but Elinor was careful in guarding her countenance from every expression that could give her words a suspicious tendency.
  • Marianne’s countenance sunk.
  • "It is charming weather for THEM indeed," she continued, as she sat down to the breakfast table with a happy countenance.

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  • Elinor watched his countenance and saw its expression becoming more tranquil.
  • It was a very awkward moment; and the countenance of each shewed that it was so.
  • His appearance however was not unpleasing, in spite of his being in the opinion of Marianne and Margaret an absolute old bachelor, for he was on the wrong side of five and thirty; but though his face was not handsome, his countenance was sensible, and his address was particularly gentlemanlike.
  • At that moment she first perceived him, and her whole countenance glowing with sudden delight, she would have moved towards him instantly, had not her sister caught hold of her.
  • As she said this, she looked earnestly at Lucy, hoping to discover something in her countenance; perhaps the falsehood of the greatest part of what she had been saying; but Lucy’s countenance suffered no change.
  • As she said this, she looked earnestly at Lucy, hoping to discover something in her countenance; perhaps the falsehood of the greatest part of what she had been saying; but Lucy’s countenance suffered no change.
  • With a letter in her outstretched hand, and countenance gaily smiling, from the persuasion of bringing comfort, she entered their room, saying, "Now, my dear, I bring you something that I am sure will do you good."
  • Had not Elinor, in the sad countenance of her sister, seen a check to all mirth, she could have been entertained by Mrs. Jennings’s endeavours to cure a disappointment in love, by a variety of sweetmeats and olives, and a good fire.
  • His countenance, as he entered the room, was not too happy, even for Elinor.
  • But it was then too late, and with a countenance meaning to be open, she sat down again and talked of the weather.
  • Her complexion was sallow; and her features small, without beauty, and naturally without expression; but a lucky contraction of the brow had rescued her countenance from the disgrace of insipidity, by giving it the strong characters of pride and ill nature.
  • My partiality does not blind me; he certainly is not so handsome as Willoughby—but at the same time, there is something much more pleasing in his countenance.
  • It was late in the morning before they returned home; and no sooner had they entered the house than Marianne flew eagerly up stairs, and when Elinor followed, she found her turning from the table with a sorrowful countenance, which declared that no Willoughby had been there.
  • But though SHE never spoke of it out of her own family, Elinor could see its influence on her mind, in the something like confusion of countenance with which she entered, and an attempt at cordiality in her behaviour to herself.
  • Had Mrs. Dashwood, like her daughter, heard Willoughby’s story from himself—had she witnessed his distress, and been under the influence of his countenance and his manner, it is probable that her compassion would have been greater.
  • Mrs. Dashwood, whose eyes, as she answered the servant’s inquiry, had intuitively taken the same direction, was shocked to perceive by Elinor’s countenance how much she really suffered, and a moment afterwards, alike distressed by Marianne’s situation, knew not on which child to bestow her principal attention.
  • I once knew a lady who in temper and mind greatly resembled your sister, who thought and judged like her, but who from an inforced change—from a series of unfortunate circumstances"— Here he stopt suddenly; appeared to think that he had said too much, and by his countenance gave rise to conjectures, which might not otherwise have entered Elinor’s head.

  • There are no more uses of "countenance" in the book.


To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: a pleasant countenance Define
facial expression; or face; or composure
as in: giving countenance Define
to tolerate, approve, or show favor or support
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