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minuteness
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Jane Eyre
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minuteness
Used In
Jane Eyre
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unspecified meaning
  • In five minutes more the cloud of bewilderment dissolved: I knew quite well that I was in my own bed, and that the red glare was the nursery fire.
  • She considered me attentively for a minute or two, then further added — "She had better be put to bed soon; she looks tired: are you tired?" she asked, placing her hand on my shoulder.

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  • Never mind, — wait a minute: Adele is not ready to go to bed yet.
  • "So much?" was the doubtful answer; and he prolonged his scrutiny for some minutes.
  • Mrs. Reed and I were left alone: some minutes passed in silence; she was sewing, I was watching her.
  • A great tumult succeeded for some minutes, during which Miss Miller repeatedly exclaimed, "Silence!" and "Order!"
  • Discipline prevailed: in five minutes the confused throng was resolved into order, and comparative silence quelled the Babel clamour of tongues.
  • And in five minutes more she shut it up.
  • He scrutinised the reverse of these living medals some five minutes, then pronounced sentence.
  • She was pensive a few minutes, then rousing herself, she said cheerfully — "But you two are my visitors to-night; I must treat you as such."

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  • About ten minutes after, the driver got down and opened a pair of gates: we passed through, and they clashed to behind us.
  • In two minutes he rose from the stile: his face expressed pain when he tried to move.
  • "Enough!" he called out in a few minutes.
  • But I stayed out a few minutes longer with Adele and Pilot — ran a race with her, and played a game of battledore and shuttlecock.
  • I am going to leave you a few minutes.
  • At the end of a few minutes he inquired in rather a peculiar tone — "I forget whether you said you saw anything when you opened your chamber door."
  • "Another minute, and she will despise me for a hypocrite," thought I; and an impulse of fury against Reed, Brocklehurst, and Co. bounded in my pulses at the conviction.
  • I am up now; but at your peril you fetch a candle yet: wait two minutes till I get into some dry garments, if any dry there be — yes, here is my dressing-gown.
  • "That is for your impudence in answering mama awhile since," said he, "and for your sneaking way of getting behind curtains, and for the look you had in your eyes two minutes since, you rat!"
  • He had been looking two minutes at the fire, and I had been looking the same length of time at him, when, turning suddenly, he caught my gaze fastened on his physiognomy.
  • I feared to return to the nursery, and feared to go forward to the parlour; ten minutes I stood in agitated hesitation; the vehement ringing of the breakfast-room bell decided me; I MUST enter.
  • She went into the house; I stayed behind a few minutes to plant in my garden a handful of roots I had dug up in the forest, and which I feared would wither if I left them till the morning.
  • Bessie and I conversed about old times an hour longer, and then she was obliged to leave me: I saw her again for a few minutes the next morning at Lowton, while I was waiting for the coach.
  • She pulled out of her box, about ten minutes ago, a little pink silk frock; rapture lit her face as she unfolded it; coquetry runs in her blood, blends with her brains, and seasons the marrow of her bones.
  • It wanted but a few minutes of six, and shortly after that hour had struck, the distant roll of wheels announced the coming coach; I went to the door and watched its lamps approach rapidly through the gloom.
  • Such is the imperfect nature of man! such spots are there on the disc of the clearest planet; and eyes like Miss Scatcherd’s can only see those minute defects, and are blind to the full brightness of the orb.
  • I resolved, in the depth of my heart, that I would be most moderate — most correct; and, having reflected a few minutes in order to arrange coherently what I had to say, I told her all the story of my sad childhood.
  • At last, having held a document before her glasses for nearly five minutes, she presented it across the counter, accompanying the act by another inquisitive and mistrustful glance — it was for J.E. "Is there only one?"
  • She is now with Sophie, undergoing a robing process: in a few minutes she will re-enter; and I know what I shall see, — a miniature of Celine Varens, as she used to appear on the boards at the rising of — But never mind that.
  • During the early part of the morning, I momentarily expected his coming; he was not in the frequent habit of entering the schoolroom, but he did step in for a few minutes sometimes, and I had the impression that he was sure to visit it that day.
  • He looked at me for a minute.
  • Mr. Rochester, putting down his candle, said to me, "Wait a minute," and he went forward to the inner apartment.
  • "They’ll be here in ten minutes."
  • At its termination, Colonel Dent and his party consulted in whispers for two minutes, then the Colonel called out — "Bride!"
  • The minutes passed very slowly: fifteen were counted before the library-door again opened.
  • Nor was it unwarranted: in five minutes more the grating key, the yielding lock, warned me my watch was relieved.
  • He looked at me some minutes.
  • She was talking of you only this morning, and wishing you would come, but she is sleeping now, or was ten minutes ago, when I was up at the house.
  • She passed about five minutes each day in her mother’s sick-room, and no more.
  • I was trying to turn myself a few minutes since, and find I cannot move a limb.
  • After a silence of some minutes she observed — "With her constitution she should have lived to a good old age: her life was shortened by trouble."
  • But I really thought he came in here five minutes ago, and said that in a month you would be his wife.
  • He may be coming now, and to meet him will save some minutes of suspense.
  • For a few minutes, while you smooth your hair — which is somewhat dishevelled; and bathe your face — which looks feverish?
  • While I tried to devour my tears, a fit of coughing seized Helen; it did not, however, wake the nurse; when it was over, she lay some minutes exhausted; then she whispered — "Jane, your little feet are bare; lie down and cover yourself with my quilt."
  • When I saw my charmer thus come in accompanied by a cavalier, I seemed to hear a hiss, and the green snake of jealousy, rising on undulating coils from the moonlit balcony, glided within my waistcoat, and ate its way in two minutes to my heart’s core.
  • Mr. Rochester let him sit three minutes after he had swallowed the liquid; he then took his arm — "Now I am sure you can get on your feet," he said — "try."
  • The ten minutes John had given seemed very long, but at last wheels were heard; four equestrians galloped up the drive, and after them came two open carriages.
  • Habitually obedient to John, I came up to his chair: he spent some three minutes in thrusting out his tongue at me as far as he could without damaging the roots: I knew he would soon strike, and while dreading the blow, I mused on the disgusting and ugly appearance of him who would presently deal it.
  • I had finished: Miss Temple regarded me a few minutes in silence; she then said — "I know something of Mr. Lloyd; I shall write to him; if his reply agrees with your statement, you shall be publicly cleared from every imputation; to me, Jane, you are clear now."
  • She was not allowed much time for meditation: a monitor, a great rough girl, presently came up, exclaiming in a strong Cumberland accent — "Helen Burns, if you don’t go and put your drawer in order, and fold up your work this minute, I’ll tell Miss Scatcherd to come and look at it!"
  • When I returned to my seat, that lady was just delivering an order of which I did not catch the import; but Burns immediately left the class, and going into the small inner room where the books were kept, returned in half a minute, carrying in her hand a bundle of twigs tied together at one end.
  • Retaining every minute form of respect, every propriety of my station, I could still meet him in argument without fear or uneasy restraint; this suited both him and me.
  • I ask only minutes.
  • I almost wondered they did not check their songs and whispers to catch the suspended revelation; but they would have had to wait many minutes — so long was the silence protracted.
  • To-night I was to be Miss Miller’s bed-fellow; she helped me to undress: when laid down I glanced at the long rows of beds, each of which was quickly filled with two occupants; in ten minutes the single light was extinguished, and amidst silence and complete darkness I fell asleep.
  • Well, I have been waiting for you long, and listening: yet not one movement have I heard, nor one sob: five minutes more of that death-like hush, and I should have forced the lock like a burglar.
  • Now came a pause of ten minutes, during which I, by this time in perfect possession of my wits, observed all the female Brocklehursts produce their pocket-handkerchiefs and apply them to their optics, while the elderly lady swayed herself to and fro, and the two younger ones whispered, "How shocking!"
  • Take one day; share it into sections; to each section apportion its task: leave no stray unemployed quarters of an hour, ten minutes, five minutes — include all; do each piece of business in its turn with method, with rigid regularity.
  • Take one day; share it into sections; to each section apportion its task: leave no stray unemployed quarters of an hour, ten minutes, five minutes — include all; do each piece of business in its turn with method, with rigid regularity.
  • She came and shook hand with me when she heard that I was her governess; and as I led her in to breakfast, I addressed some phrases to her in her own tongue: she replied briefly at first, but after we were seated at the table, and she had examined me some ten minutes with her large hazel eyes, she suddenly commenced chattering fluently.
  • I pondered the mystery a minute or two; but finding it insolvable, and being certain it could not be of much moment, I dismissed, and soon forgot it.
  • In a minute I had my face under their bonnets, in contact first with Mary’s soft cheek, then with Diana’s flowing curls.
  • As he turned aside his face a minute, I saw a tear slide from under the sealed eyelid, and trickle down the manly cheek.
  • A weakness, beginning inwardly, extending to the limbs, seized me, and I fell: I lay on the ground some minutes, pressing my face to the wet turf.
  • Ere many minutes had elapsed, I was again on my feet, however, and again searching something — a resource, or at least an informant.
  • He stood considering me some minutes; then added, "She looks sensible, but not at all handsome."
  • After a weary process, and resting every five minutes, I succeeded in dressing myself.
  • I maintained a grave silence for some minutes.
  • Diana and Mary’s general answer to this question was a sigh, and some minutes of apparently mournful meditation.
  • For some minutes no one spoke.
  • How many minutes, for instance, had I devoted to studying the arrangement of this very room?
  • One morning at breakfast, Diana, after looking a little pensive for some minutes, asked him, "If his plans were yet unchanged."
  • He took me into the dining-room, surveyed me keenly all over, pronounced me "fair as a lily, and not only the pride of his life, but the desire of his eyes," and then telling me he would give me but ten minutes to eat some breakfast, he rang the bell.
  • Do not ask me, reader, to give a minute account of that day; as before, I sought work; as before, I was repulsed; as before, I starved; but once did food pass my lips.
  • Won in youth to religion, she has cultivated my original qualities thus:— From the minute germ, natural affection, she has developed the overshadowing tree, philanthropy.
  • My companion expressed no surprise at this emotion, nor did he question me as to its cause; he only said — "We will wait a few minutes, Jane, till you are more composed."
  • Stop one minute!
  • Their visit was not so still as Miss Ingram’s had been: we heard hysterical giggling and little shrieks proceeding from the library; and at the end of about twenty minutes they burst the door open, and came running across the hall, as if they were half-scared out of their wits.
  • As John took his horse, and he followed me into the hall, he told me to make haste and put something dry on, and then return to him in the library; and he stopped me, as I made for the staircase, to extort a promise that I would not be long: nor was I long; in five minutes I rejoined him.
  • Traversing the long and matted gallery, I descended the slippery steps of oak; then I gained the hall: I halted there a minute; I looked at some pictures on the walls (one, I remember, represented a grim man in a cuirass, and one a lady with powdered hair and a pearl necklace), at a bronze lamp pendent from the ceiling, at a great clock whose case was of oak curiously carved, and ebon black with time and rubbing.
  • One afternoon (I had then been three weeks at Lowood), as I was sitting with a slate in my hand, puzzling over a sum in long division, my eyes, raised in abstraction to the window, caught sight of a figure just passing: I recognised almost instinctively that gaunt outline; and when, two minutes after, all the school, teachers included, rose en masse, it was not necessary for me to look up in order to ascertain whose entrance they thus greeted.
  • When I came to the stile, I stopped a minute, looked round and listened, with an idea that a horse’s hoofs might ring on the causeway again, and that a rider in a cloak, and a Gytrash-like Newfoundland dog, might be again apparent: I saw only the hedge and a pollard willow before me, rising up still and straight to meet the moonbeams; I heard only the faintest waft of wind roaming fitful among the trees round Thornfield, a mile distant; and when I glanced down in the direction of the…
  • I have always faithfully observed the one, up to the very moment of bursting, sometimes with volcanic vehemence, into the other; and as neither present circumstances warranted, nor my present mood inclined me to mutiny, I observed careful obedience to St. John’s directions; and in ten minutes I was treading the wild track of the glen, side by side with him.
  • One morning, being left alone with him a few minutes in the parlour, I ventured to approach the window-recess — which his table, chair, and desk consecrated as a kind of study — and I was going to speak, though not very well knowing in what words to frame my inquiry — for it is at all times difficult to break the ice of reserve glassing over such natures as his — when he saved me the trouble by being the first to commence a dialogue.
  • It is past eleven o’clock: I heard it strike some minutes since."
  • "Yes; he did not stay many minutes in the house: Missis was very high with him; she called him afterwards a ’sneaking tradesman.’
  • "Well," he said, after some minutes’ silence, "it is strange; but that sentence has penetrated my breast painfully.
  • After some minutes’ silence, he continued, cheerily — "Now, Janet, I’ll explain to you all about it.
  • He mused — for ten minutes he held counsel with himself: he formed his resolve, and announced it — "Enough! all shall bolt out at once, like the bullet from the barrel.
  • We saw him approach her; and then, ma’am, she yelled and gave a spring, and the next minute she lay smashed on the pavement."
  • "Hannah," said Mr. St. John, at last, "let her sit there at present, and ask her no questions; in ten minutes more, give her the remainder of that milk and bread.
  • Mary did look up, and she did stare at me: the ladle with which she was basting a pair of chickens roasting at the fire, did for some three minutes hang suspended in air; and for the same space of time John’s knives also had rest from the polishing process: but Mary, bending again over the roast, said only — "Have you, Miss?

  • There are no more uses of "minuteness" in the book.


To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: a minute amount Define
very, very small
as in: keep the minutes Define
a written record of what happened at a meeting
Show Multiple Meanings (More common than this sense)
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