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inclined
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Jane Eyre
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inclined
Used In
Jane Eyre
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as in: I'm inclined to Define
a tendency; in the mood; or an attitude that favors something
  • I counsel you to resist firmly every temptation which would incline you to look back:
  • It is not saying too much: I know what I feel, and how averse are my inclinations to the bare thought of marriage.

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  • In the village school I found you could perform well, punctually, uprightly, labour uncongenial to your habits and inclinations; I saw you could perform it with capacity and tact: you could win while you controlled.

  • There are no more uses of "inclined" identified with this meaning, but check unspecified meaning below.

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  • I’m inclined to believe him.
  • I was inclined to laugh, but overcame the urge.

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as in: on an incline or incline his head Define
to be at an angle or to bend
  • I see her incline her head towards him,
  • She broke forth as never moon yet burst from cloud: a hand first penetrated the sable folds and waved them away; then, not a moon, but a white human form shone in the azure, inclining a glorious brow earthward.

  • There are no more uses of "incline" identified with this meaning, but check unspecified meaning below.

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  • I climbed down the incline.
  • She inclined her head to indicate her agreement.

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unspecified meaning
  • To the Public, for the indulgent ear it has inclined to a plain tale with few pretensions.
  • Yes, in a passive way: I make no effort; I follow as inclination guides me.

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  • This lane inclined up-hill all the way to Hay; having reached the middle, I sat down on a stile which led thence into a field.
  • Throwing these into distance, rose, in the foreground, a head, — a colossal head, inclined towards the iceberg, and resting against it.
  • I had nothing else to do, because it was the vacation, and I sat at them from morning till noon, and from noon till night: the length of the midsummer days favoured my inclination to apply.
  • I had indeed levelled at that prominent feature as hard a blow as my knuckles could inflict; and when I saw that either that or my look daunted him, I had the greatest inclination to follow up my advantage to purpose; but he was already with his mama.
  • Mr. Miles, the master, affirmed that he would do very well if he had fewer cakes and sweetmeats sent him from home; but the mother’s heart turned from an opinion so harsh, and inclined rather to the more refined idea that John’s sallowness was owing to over-application and, perhaps, to pining after home.
  • You say you never heard of a Mrs. Rochester at the house up yonder, Wood; but I daresay you have many a time inclined your ear to gossip about the mysterious lunatic kept there under watch and ward.
  • I feel more inclination to put you in the way of keeping yourself, and shall endeavour to do so; but observe, my sphere is narrow.
  • And if you are inclined to despise the day of small things, seek some more efficient succour than such as I can offer.

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  • "Eagerness of a listener!" repeated she: "yes; Mr. Rochester has sat by the hour, his ear inclined to the fascinating lips that took such delight in their task of communicating; and Mr. Rochester was so willing to receive and looked so grateful for the pastime given him; you have noticed this?"
  • I knew his thoughts well, and could read his heart plainly; at the moment I felt calmer and cooler than he: I had then temporarily the advantage of him, and I conceived an inclination to do him some good, if I could.
  • "Sit there," she said, placing me on the sofa, "while we take our things off and get the tea ready; it is another privilege we exercise in our little moorland home — to prepare our own meals when we are so inclined, or when Hannah is baking, brewing, washing, or ironing."
  • I have always faithfully observed the one, up to the very moment of bursting, sometimes with volcanic vehemence, into the other; and as neither present circumstances warranted, nor my present mood inclined me to mutiny, I observed careful obedience to St. John’s directions; and in ten minutes I was treading the wild track of the glen, side by side with him.
  • You will see what impetus would be given to your efforts and mine by our physical and mental union in marriage: the only union that gives a character of permanent conformity to the destinies and designs of human beings; and, passing over all minor caprices — all trivial difficulties and delicacies of feeling — all scruple about the degree, kind, strength or tenderness of mere personal inclination — you will hasten to enter into that union at once.
  • St. John continued — "It is hard work to control the workings of inclination and turn the bent of nature; but that it may be done, I know from experience.
  • You intend to make yourself a complete stranger to me: to live under this roof only as Adele’s governess; if ever I say a friendly word to you, if ever a friendly feeling inclines you again to me, you will say, — ’That man had nearly made me his mistress: I must be ice and rock to him;’ and ice and rock you will accordingly become."

  • There are no more uses of "inclined" in the book.


To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: I'm inclined to Define
a tendency; in the mood; or an attitude that favors something
as in: on an incline or incline his head Define
to be at an angle or to bend
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Book Vocabulary
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