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countenance
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Jane Eyre
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countenance
Used In
Jane Eyre
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as in: a pleasant countenance Define
facial expression; or face; or composure
  • ...all their countenances expressed displeasure,

  • There are no more uses of "countenance" identified with this meaning, but check unspecified meaning below.

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  • She has a pleasant countenance.
  • Her countenance grew stern.

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as in: giving countenance Define
to tolerate, approve, or show favor or support
  • I cannot possibly countenance any such inconsistent proceeding,

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  • We will not countenance torture.
  • They countenance and support terrorism.

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unspecified meaning
  • It is a point difficult to fix where the features and countenance are so much at variance as in your case.
  • The first was a tall lady with dark hair, dark eyes, and a pale and large forehead; her figure was partly enveloped in a shawl, her countenance was grave, her bearing erect.

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  • I judged by your countenance, sir, which was troubled when you said the suggestion had returned upon you.
  • I sought in her countenance and features a likeness to Mr. Rochester, but found none: no trait, no turn of expression announced relationship.
  • Miss Miller was more ordinary; ruddy in complexion, though of a careworn countenance; hurried in gait and action, like one who had always a multiplicity of tasks on hand: she looked, indeed, what I afterwards found she really was, an under-teacher.
  • But unluckily the Varens, six months before, had given me this filette Adele, who, she affirmed, was my daughter; and perhaps she may be, though I see no proofs of such grim paternity written in her countenance: Pilot is more like me than she.
  • Because I want to read your countenance — turn!
  • Mrs. Fairfax surprised me by looking out of the window with a sad countenance, and saying gravely — "Miss Eyre, will you come to breakfast?"
  • What does that inexplicable, that uncanny turn of countenance mean?
  • But if you look up and smile with that countenance, I shall swear concession before I know to what, and that will make a fool of me.

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  • I don’t know what sphynx-like expression is forming in your countenance.
  • Most people would have termed her a splendid woman of her age: and so she was, no doubt, physically speaking; but then there was an expression of almost insupportable haughtiness in her bearing and countenance.
  • I must watch this ghastly countenance — these blue, still lips forbidden to unclose — these eyes now shut, now opening, now wandering through the room, now fixing on me, and ever glazed with the dulness of horror.
  • I saw Mr. Rochester shudder: a singularly marked expression of disgust, horror, hatred, warped his countenance almost to distortion; but he only said — "Come, be silent, Richard, and never mind her gibberish: don’t repeat it."
  • They were stiff with their long and jolting drive from Whitcross, and chilled with the frosty night air; but their pleasant countenances expanded to the cheerful firelight.
  • Mr. Rochester, reading my countenance, saw I had done so.
  • She had, I thought, a remarkable countenance, instinct both with power and goodness.
  • He was silent after I had uttered the last sentence, and I presently risked an upward glance at his countenance.
  • Whether he was incensed or surprised, or what, it was not easy to tell: he could command his countenance thoroughly.
  • I naturally asked myself that question as I saw him turn to her and look at her; and, as naturally, I sought the answer to the inquiry in his countenance.
  • Mary’s countenance was equally intelligent — her features equally pretty; but her expression was more reserved, and her manners, though gentle, more distant.
  • I knew Mr. Rochester; though the begrimed face, the disordered dress (his coat hanging loose from one arm, as if it had been almost torn from his back in a scuffle), the desperate and scowling countenance, the rough, bristling hair might well have disguised him.
  • I believe he is of mine; — I am sure he is — I feel akin to him — I understand the language of his countenance and movements: though rank and wealth sever us widely, I have something in my brain and heart, in my blood and nerves, that assimilates me mentally to him.
  • But in his countenance I saw a change: that looked desperate and brooding — that reminded me of some wronged and fettered wild beast or bird, dangerous to approach in his sullen woe.
  • His countenance reminded one of a lamp quenched, waiting to be re-lit — and alas! it was not himself that could now kindle the lustre of animated expression: he was dependent on another for that office!
  • She was intent on her work, in which her whole thoughts seemed absorbed: on her hard forehead, and in her commonplace features, was nothing either of the paleness or desperation one would have expected to see marking the countenance of a woman who had attempted murder, and whose intended victim had followed her last night to her lair, and (as I believed), charged her with the crime she wished to perpetrate.
  • Mary had a milder and more open countenance than Blanche; softer features too, and a skin some shades fairer (Miss Ingram was dark as a Spaniard) — but Mary was deficient in life: her face lacked expression, her eye lustre; she had nothing to say, and having once taken her seat, remained fixed like a statue in its niche.
  • In each of the sisters there was one trait of the mother — and only one; the thin and pallid elder daughter had her parent’s Cairngorm eye: the blooming and luxuriant younger girl had her contour of jaw and chin — perhaps a little softened, but still imparting an indescribable hardness to the countenance otherwise so voluptuous and buxom.
  • But no hint to that effect escaping him and his countenance becoming more overcast, I suddenly remembered that I might have been all wrong, and was perhaps playing the fool unwittingly; and I began gently to withdraw myself from his arms — but he eagerly snatched me closer.
  • Indeed, as he leaned back against the crag behind him, folded his arms on his chest, and fixed his countenance, I saw he was prepared for a long and trying opposition, and had taken in a stock of patience to last him to its close — resolved, however, that that close should be conquest for him.
  • Wild was the wrestle which should be paramount; but another feeling rose and triumphed: something hard and cynical: self-willed and resolute: it settled his passion and petrified his countenance: he went on — "During the moment I was silent, Miss Eyre, I was arranging a point with my destiny.

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To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: a pleasant countenance Define
facial expression; or face; or composure
as in: giving countenance Define
to tolerate, approve, or show favor or support
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Book Vocabulary
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