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minion
in
Henry IV, Part 1
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minion
Used In
Henry IV, Part 1
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  • Marry, then, sweet wag, when thou art king, let not us that are squires of the night’s body be called thieves of the day’s beauty: let us be Diana’s foresters, gentlemen of the shade, minions of the Moon; and let men say we be men of good government, being governed, as the sea is, by our noble and chaste mistress the Moon, under whose countenance we steal.
  • Yea, there thou makest me sad, and makest me sin In envy that my Lord Northumberland Should be the father to so blest a son,— A son who is the theme of honour’s tongue; Amongst a grove, the very straightest plant; Who is sweet Fortune’s minion and her pride: Whilst I, by looking on the praise of him, See riot and dishonour stain the brow Of my young Harry.

  • There are no more uses of "minion" in the play.


    Show samples from other sources
  • The minion that does all her dirty work.
    Marissa Meyer  --  Cinder
  • I had no idea who he was, or whether he had other, worse minions to send against me.
    Rick Riordan  --  The Trials of Apollo

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Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
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