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statutory law
The Comedy of Errors
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statutory law
Used In
The Comedy of Errors
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  • This very day a Syracusian merchant Is apprehended for arrival here; And, not being able to buy out his life, According to the statute of the town, Dies ere the weary sun set in the west.
  • Merchant of Syracuse, plead no more; I am not partial to infringe our laws: The enmity and discord which of late Sprung from the rancorous outrage of your duke To merchants, our well-dealing countrymen,— Who, wanting guilders to redeem their lives, Have seal’d his rigorous statutes with their bloods,— Excludes all pity from our threat’ning looks.
  • To see a reverend Syracusian merchant, Who put unluckily into this bay Against the laws and statutes of this town, Beheaded publicly for his offence.

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  • We think of statutory law as being written by legislators, but most of it is written in the form of rules and regulations created by governmental agencies.
  • Atticus had two weighty advantages: although the white girl was fourteen years of age the defendant was not indicted for statutory rape, therefore Atticus could and did prove consent.
    Harper Lee  --  Go Set a Watchman

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