To better see all uses of the word
Cupid
in
Romeo and Juliet
please enable javascript.

Cupid
Used In
Romeo and Juliet
Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
Go to Play Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • You are a lover; borrow Cupid’s wings, And soar with them above a common bound.
  • Well, in that hit you miss: she’ll not be hit With Cupid’s arrow,—she hath Dian’s wit; And, in strong proof of chastity well arm’d, From love’s weak childish bow she lives unharm’d.
  • Appear thou in the likeness of a sigh: Speak but one rhyme, and I am satisfied; Cry but ’Ah me!’ pronounce but Love and dove; Speak to my gossip Venus one fair word, One nickname for her purblind son and heir, Young auburn Cupid, he that shot so trim When King Cophetua lov’d the beggar-maid!
  • The date is out of such prolixity: We’ll have no Cupid hoodwink’d with a scarf, Bearing a Tartar’s painted bow of lath, Scaring the ladies like a crow-keeper; Nor no without-book prologue, faintly spoke After the prompter, for our entrance: But, let them measure us by what they will, We’ll measure them a measure, and be gone.
  • — O, she is lame! love’s heralds should be thoughts, Which ten times faster glide than the sun’s beams, Driving back shadows over lowering hills: Therefore do nimble-pinion’d doves draw love, And therefore hath the wind-swift Cupid wings.

  • There are no more uses of "Cupid" in the play.


    Show samples from other sources
  • Cupid is the Roman counterpart to the Greek Eros.
  • I swear to thee by Cupid’s strongest bow,
    William Shakespeare  --  A Midsummer Night’s Dream

  • Go to more samples
Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
Go to Play Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading