To see all instances of the word
disposition
used in
Hamlet, Prince of Denmark
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disposition
Used in
Hamlet, Prince of Denmark
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  • A truant disposition, good my lord.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • But with much forcing of his disposition.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • What may this mean, That thou, dead corse, again in complete steel, Revisit'st thus the glimpses of the moon, Making night hideous, and we fools of nature So horridly to shake our disposition With thoughts beyond the reaches of our souls?  (not reviewed by editor)

  • I have of late,—but wherefore I know not,—lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises; and indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament, this majestical roof fretted with golden fire,—why, it appears no other thing to me than a foul and pestilent congregation of vapours.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • But come;— Here, as before, never, so help you mercy, How strange or odd soe'er I bear myself,— As I, perchance, hereafter shall think meet To put an antic disposition on,— That you, at such times seeing me, never shall, With arms encumber'd thus, or this head-shake, Or by pronouncing of some doubtful phrase, As 'Well, well, we know'; or 'We could, an if we would';— Or 'If we list to speak'; or 'There be, an if they might';— Or such ambiguous giving out, to note That you know aught of…  (not reviewed by editor)

To see samples from other sources, click a sense of the word below:
as in: a kind disposition
as in: disposition of the matter
as in: disposition of the assets
as in: a disposition to learn
as in: strategic troop disposition
To see an overview of word senses, click here.

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