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Hamlet, Prince of Denmark
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Hamlet, Prince of Denmark
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  • Therefore our sometime sister, now our queen, Th’ imperial jointress to this warlike state, Have we, as ’twere with a defeated joy,— With an auspicious and one dropping eye, With mirth in funeral, and with dirge in marriage, In equal scale weighing delight and dole,— Taken to wife; nor have we herein barr’d Your better wisdoms, which have freely gone With this affair along:—or all, our thanks.
  • I have of late,—but wherefore I know not,—lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises; and indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o’erhanging firmament, this majestical roof fretted with golden fire,—why, it appears no other thing to me than a foul and pestilent congregation of vapours.

  • There are no more uses of "mirth" in the play.

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  • It was an evening of many stories and great mirth.
  • He felt no mirth or humor and wondered if there’d ever be a time again when he would.
    James Dashner  --  The Maze Runner

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